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Currencies

Exchange Rate Unification: CBN devalues official rate to N380/$1

The CBN has devalued the official exchange rate for the second time this year.

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parallel market, Covid-19: N3.5 trillion disbursed as stimulus package for the Nigerian economy, CBN Vs NESG: Waving the white flag for the benefit of Nigerians, Exchange Rate Unification: CBN devalues official rate to N380/$1, Nigerian banks have written off N1.9 trillion impaired loans in past 4 years, CBN sandbox operations, Stirling Trust Company Limited, Key highlights of the October 2020 Business Expectations Survey Report, A Total of N3.5 trillion was disbursed in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, in addition to several other interventions to reflate the economy - CBN, BOFIA 2020: Steps forward or backwards for Nigerian banks, Total credit to the economy rose to N19.54trillion – CBN Governor

Information on the website of the central bank reveals the CBN has adjusted the official exchange rate to N380/$1 from N360.1/$1. The adjustment occurred on Thursday August 6th 2020.

This suggest the CBN may have unified the exchange rate in line with the promise made by Godwin Emefiele, the Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria.

CBN: Devalues Exchange Rate.

In the data seen by Nairametrics, the Central Bank priced the official exchange rate as follows;

READ MORE: Exchange rate gains big at NAFEX as forex turnover pops 916%

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Current (Previous)

Buy- N379 (N360)

Central – N379.5 (N360.5)

Sell – N380 (N360.1)

There were no official press releases explaining the reason for the devaluation or adjustment as the central bank likes to call it. This is now the second devaluation of the official exchange rate after the rate was adjusted from N307 to N361 on the 20th of March 2020. The CBN has also adjusted the exchange rate for the SMIS window.

READ MORE: IMF list unpopular policies CBN must reverse

Exchange Rate Unification?

In June, the CBN Governor Godwin Emefiele assured investors in June that the CBN will unify the exchange rate around the NAFEX rate in line with the conditions of the world bank.

“We will continue to pursue unification around the NAFEX Market”.  Emefiele

However, this has taken longer that required and may have resulted in the postponement of a planned world bank meeting where an approval of the initial $3 billion loan from the world bank would have been obtained in September and October for the Federal and State Governments respectively.

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One of the conditions for the disbursement of the loan was a unification of the exchange rate which most analysts believe the CBN has dithered on for months.

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READ MORE: BOOM: Nigeria’s total debt portfolio hits at N27.4 Trillion

Nigeria’s exchange rate at the NAFEX closed at N386/$1 on Friday a N6 premium from the Central Bank’s buy rate. However, this is closer when compared to the N26 disparity when the exchange rate was N360/$1.

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The latest adjustment however indicates this could be the CBN’s biggest move yet at exchange rate unification as the rate is closer to if not the same with the N380/$1 announced in July for the SMIS window.

READ ALSO: Bitcoin robbers are cashing in as they transfer $7 million worth of BTCs

World Bank debacle

The World Bank committee working on the loan was meant to present to their board on August 6th 2020 but it appears this has now been moved to a latter date. Critics suggest this may have been due to the delay to meet conditions precedent to granting the initial $1.5 billion loan some of which incudes the $1.5 billion loan.

“The amount we are raising in the first instance is $1.5 billion for FG and around September October we are hoping to close out on the facility meant for states and the amount is meant to be $1-1.5 billion.” Ahmed

According to Zainab Ahmed, the Minister of Finance  Nigeria was raising “in the first instance is $1.5 billion for FG and around September October we are hoping to close out on the facility meant for states and the amount is meant to be $1-1.5 billion.” The implication of the delay in obtaining the loans suggest states banking on the world bank facility will not have to wait beyond October should the world bank refuse to reconvene next week.

 

Abiola has spent about 14 years in journalism. His career has covered some top local print media like TELL Magazine, Broad Street Journal, The Point Newspaper.The Bloomberg MEI alumni has interviewed some of the most influential figures of the IMF, G-20 Summit, Pre-G20 Central Bank Governors and Finance Ministers, Critical Communication World Conference.The multiple award winner is variously trained in business and markets journalism at Lagos Business School, and Pan-Atlantic University. You may contact him via email - [email protected]

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. OluOku

    August 9, 2020 at 1:36 pm

    Gradually Naira is becoming the weakest in Africa. Nigerian politicians are not worried since they have stacked their money in USD in septic tanks, soakaway, underground and inside cementeries. God will force the monies away very, very soon.

  2. Oluwaseyi Israel Adesigbin

    August 9, 2020 at 8:58 pm

    Why have nigerian banks decided to block cross border transactions??

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Currencies

Naira falls at NAFEX window as dollar supply continues to decline

The exchange rate between the naira and the dollar depreciated closing at N394.50/$1 at the NAFEX Window.

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Central Bank of Nigeria, Foreign exchange market, Naira vs dollas, IMF, Foreign Reserves, External reserves, CBN, Why do we all love the dollar? 

On January 25, 2021, the exchange rate between the naira and the dollar depreciated closing at N394.50/$1 at the NAFEX (I&E Window) where forex is traded officially.

Forex turnover, however, dropped further by about 10.2% as pressure on the foreign exchange market continues.

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) has moved to create more liquidity in the foreign exchange market as they insisted that deposit money banks and International Money Transfer Operators (IMTOs) must pay diaspora remittances to beneficiaries in dollars as against the initial practice of paying in naira.

This will also help to create more stability and transparency in the forex market.

Also, the exchange rate at the black market where forex traded unofficially remained stable at N477/$1. The exchange rate at the parallel market closed at N477/$1 on the previous trading day of January 22, 2021.

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The exchange rate disparity between the parallel market and the official market is about N82.50, representing a 20.9% devaluation differential.

The Naira depreciated against the dollar at the Investors and Exporters (I&E) window on Monday, closing at N394.50/$1. This represents a 33 kobo drop when compared to the N394.17/$1 that it closed on the previous trading day.

  • The opening indicative rate was N393.30 to a dollar on Monday, this represents a 15 kobo drop when compared with the N393.15 to a dollar that was recorded on Friday, January 22, 2021.
  • The N395 to a dollar was the highest rate during intra-day trading before it closed at N394.50 to a dollar. It also sold for as low as N390/$1 during intra-day trading.
  • Forex turnover at the Investor and Exporters (I&E) window dropped by 10.2% on Monday, January 25, 2021.
  • According to the data tracked by Nairametrics from FMDQ, forex turnover declined from $44.51 million on Friday, January 22, 2021, to $39.99 million on Monday, January 25, 2021.
  • The exchange rate is still being affected by low oil prices, dollar scarcity, a backlog of forex demand, and a shaky economy that has been hit by the coronavirus pandemic.
  • There are fears that the exchange rate at the black market might be under pressure in the coming weeks as importers scramble for dollars to meet their demands.

Oil price steady rise

Brent crude oil price is at about $55.60 per barrel as of Tuesday morning, as it moves towards the $60 mark, a strong sign that global demand could sustain price increases in 2021.

  • This appears as a boost to Nigeria as the country’s crude oil price benchmark for 2020 was $40 while it projected an oil production output of 1.8 million barrels per day.
  • Nigeria has a production capacity of 2.5 million barrels per day but is subject to OPEC’s crude oil production cuts, which are expected to help sustain higher oil prices.
  • The higher oil prices and steady production output have positively impacted Nigeria’s external reserves, rising sharply to $36.304 million according to central bank data dated January 14, 2020.
  • This is the highest level since July 2020 and a sign that higher oil prices and steady output levels may be contributing significantly to Nigeria’s foreign exchange position.

Nigeria rising external reserves

  • The external reserve has risen to $36.508 billion as of January 21, 2021.
  • Nairametrics had earlier reported that the government may have taken receipt of the $1-1.5 billion World Bank loan.
  • The external reserves have increased by $1.135 billion since December 31, 2020, when it closed the year at $35.3 billion.
  • Nigeria also needs the external reserves to hit $40 billion if it is to adequately meet some of the pent up demand that has piled up since 2020 when oil prices crashed and the pandemic caused major economic lockdowns.

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Currencies

Naira falls across forex markets as CBN moves against IMTOs

The exchange rate at the black market where forex traded unofficially depreciated at N477/$1.

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Naira falls across forex markets as businesses resume after public holidays

On January 22, 2021, the exchange rate between the naira and the dollar depreciated closing at N394.17/$1 at the NAFEX (I&E Window) where forex is traded officially.

Forex turnover, however, dropped by about 42.2% as pressure on the foreign exchange market continues.

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) in a new circular, read the riot act to the International Money Transfer Operators (IMTOs) as they have threatened to sanction some of them who still facilitate diaspora remittances in naira, contrary to its earlier directive that it must be in foreign currency.

READ: Nigeria faces prolonged exchange rate crisis as oil prices remain stuck at $40

Also, the exchange rate at the black market where forex traded unofficially depreciated at N477/$1. The exchange rate at the parallel market closed at N475/$1 on the previous trading day of January 21, 2021, representing a N2 drop.

Specta

The exchange rate disparity between the parallel market and the official market is about N82.83, representing a 17.36% devaluation differential.

READ: CBN to prevent exporters with unrepatriated export proceeds from banking services

The Naira depreciated against the dollar at the Investors and Exporters (I&E) window on Friday, closing at N394.17/$1. This represents a 17 kobo drop when compared to the N394/$1 that it closed on the previous trading day.

  • The opening indicative rate was N393.15 to a dollar on Friday, this represents a N1.01 gain when compared with the N394.16 to a dollar that was recorded on Thursday, January 21, 2021.
  • The N395 to a dollar was the highest rate during intra-day trading before it closed at N394.17 to a dollar. It also sold for as low as N390/$1 during intra-day trading.
  • Forex turnover at the Investor and Exporters (I&E) window dropped by 42.2% on Friday, January 22, 2021.
  • According to the data tracked by Nairametrics from FMDQ, forex turnover declined from $77.04 million on Thursday, January 21, 2021, to $44.51 million on Friday, January 22, 2021.
  • The exchange rate is still being affected by low oil prices, dollar scarcity, a backlog of forex demand, and a shaky economy that has been hit by the coronavirus pandemic.
  • There are fears that the exchange rate at the black market might be under pressure in the coming weeks as importers scramble for dollars to meet their demands.

READ: A summer of higher food prices, limited room for monetary policy

Oil price steady rise

Brent crude oil price is at about $55.34 per barrel as of Monday morning, as it moves towards the $60 mark, a strong sign that global demand could sustain price increases in 2021.

  • This appears as a boost to Nigeria as the country’s crude oil price benchmark for 2020 was $40 while it projected an oil production output of 1.8 million barrels per day.
  • Nigeria has a production capacity of 2.5 million barrels per day but is subject to OPEC’s crude oil production cuts, which are expected to help sustain higher oil prices.
  • The higher oil prices and steady production output have positively impacted Nigeria’s external reserves, rising sharply to $36.304 million according to central bank data dated January 14, 2020.
  • This is the highest level since July 2020 and a sign that higher oil prices and steady output levels may be contributing significantly to Nigeria’s foreign exchange position.

READ: A Joe Biden presidency and its impact on Nigeria’s oil

Nigeria rising external reserves

  • The external reserve has risen to $36.508 billion as of January 21, 2021.
  • Nairametrics had earlier reported that the government may have taken receipt of the $1-1.5 billion World Bank loan.
  • The external reserves have increased by $1.135 billion since December 31, 2020, when it closed the year at $35.3 billion.
  • Nigeria also needs the external reserves to hit $40 billion if it is to adequately meet some of the pent up demand that has piled up since 2020 when oil prices crashed and the pandemic caused major economic lockdowns.

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Currencies

CBN to prevent exporters with unrepatriated export proceeds from banking services

From January 31, 2021, the CBN will bar exporters who fail to repatriate export proceeds from accessing banking services.

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CBN to restrict foreign exchange on more food imports

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) has announced the prohibition of all Nigerian exporters who are yet to repatriate their export proceeds, from banking services effective from January 31, 2021.

The apex bank has a standing policy that instructs exporters to repatriate exports within 90 days for oil and gas and 180 days for non-oil exports constitute a breach of the extant regulation.

In a letter issued by one of the commercial banks to its exporters, and seen by Nairametrics, it cited the CBN’s new circular stating that it will bar exporters who do not repatriate from accessing banking services.

See excerpt of the CBN circular barring exporters from accessing banking services.

“Please be informed that the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) through its circular referenced TED/EXP/CON?NEX/01/001 dated 13th January 2021 has instructed that all exporters with unrepatriated export proceeds before 31st January 2021 should be barred from accessing all banking services.”

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In lieu of this, all concerned exporters are urged to comply with the directive before the specified date.

Why this circular?

Analysts believe that the directive is part of a monetary control mechanism by policymakers to maintain relative stability in the exchange rate, especially after the pandemic created a wide disparity between the official exchange and the parallel market rates, eliminating incidences of over-invoicing, transfer pricing, double handling charges, etc.

  • By repatriating export proceeds via the NAFEX (Investor and Exporter window) the central bank believes this will improve liquidity in the official market and perhaps strengthen the naira at the black market where wired transfers often cost a premium of N5-N10 over the street exchange rate of N475/$1.
  • Most export proceeds find their way to the parallel market where exporters can exchange for higher naira value-boosting their gains on foreign currency conversions.
  • It is to be seen if exporters will comply with this directive or seek other means of avoiding the hammer of the exporters. Most exporters already find a way to avoid these hammers by opening foreign bank accounts where most of the export proceeds are warehoused and then sold at the black market.
  • Some rely on complex intercompany transactions to avoid repatriating the forex through the NAFEX window

What you should know

  • According to Bloomberg sources, the new directive applies to exports up until June last year.
  • In a bid to ensure prudent use of foreign exchange resources, the Central Bank of Nigeria had earlier instructed authorised dealers and exporters to only open forms M for letters of credit, bills for collection, and other forms of payment

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