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Ethiopian Airlines crash: Insurance claims hit $60m as Air Peace awaits probe

Insurance claims emanating from the crashed Boeing 737 Max jet operated by Ethiopian Airlines, has been estimated at $50 million to $60 million.

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Shareholders sue Boeing, Ethiopian preliminary findings, Boeing 737-Max model crash, Ethiopian Airlines Insurance

Insurance claims emanating from the crashed Boeing 737 Max jet operated by Ethiopian Airlines, has been estimated at between $50 million to $60 million. The crash killed all 157 passengers on board, including two Nigerians.

According to Reuters, global insurance brokerage and risk management firm, Willis Towers Watson, is the lead insurer for Ethiopian Airline. The leading insurance provider — Chubb will serve as the lead underwriter.

Initial compensations for the families of the 157 victims are expected to be within the range of $25 million. However, the amount is expected to increase as litigation mount against both Ethiopian Airlines and Boeing.

Note that while the initial insurance payments is expected to come from Ethiopian Airlines’ insurers, they could try to recoup their money from Boeing’s insurers. But this is dependent on their ability to prove that the aircraft was faulty.

In the meantime, the insured value of the downed plane alone is pegged at $50 million, industry sources said.

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A catastrophic crash: As Nairametrics reported, the Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 crashed early Sunday morning on its way to Kenya, from Ethiopia. Everybody onboard the flight died.

Prior to the crash, the pilot was said to have reported some technical difficulties minutes after takeoff, for which he was cleared to return to the airport. Unfortunately, the plane never made it back to the Bole International Airport.

Nigerian died on that flight: Nigerians involved in the crash were popular Nigerian-born Canadian professor and writer, Pius Adesanmi, and Ambassador Abiodun Bashua, a former Joint Special Representative for the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur, Sudan.

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In the meantime, Air Peace is not cancelling its Boeing 737-MAX 800 order

Despite ban by various countries on the Boeing 737-MAX 800 jets, Nigeria’s airline operator, Air Peace has stated that it has no intention to cancel the order the it made earlier last year.

Air Peace and the American aircraft manufacturer, had on September 13, 2018 signed agreement for the delivery of 10 brand new B737 MAX 800 aircraft. And following safety concerns originating from the recent crash, a spokesman for the company, Mr Chris Iwarah, said it is rather premature to start considering cancelling the orders.

“At this moment, it is premature to begin to talk about things and conclusions that have not been put in the public domain.

“Investigations into the crashes involving B737Max 800 are ongoing. So, it will not be fair at this time to begin to make definite comments on those issues.

“We are still in the domain of investigation. But, we want to assure the public that we are following the development very closely.”

Olalekan is a certified media practitioner from the Nigerian Institute of Journalism (NIJ). In the era of media convergence, Olalekan is a valuable asset, with ability to curate and broadcast news. His zeal to write was developed out of passion to shape people’s thought and opinion; serving as a guideline for their daily lives. Contact for tips: [email protected]

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Financial Services

How foreign exchange risks and others affect the Nigerian pension industry 

A report has analysed risks militating against the Pension industry in Nigeria.

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This is why you should make voluntary contributions to your pension fund

Despite being one of the fastest-growing sectors in the Nigerian financial services industry, the Nigerian pension industry has been affected by various riskssuch as the volatility in the foreign exchange and other factors.

However, these risks have harsh consequences on the retirement income of contributors. For example, in Nigeria, whilst the pension assets in the last decade have grown by 21% annually, the growth in the value of assets when converted to USDhas been about 11% over the same period. 

READ: PenCom recovers N17.51billion from defaulting employers, imposes penalties

This is according to a recent report released on Pension Sector Forum by ARM Pension, with the theme “Pension Assets Risk Management in the Face of Uncertainties 

All other things being equal, the findings revealed that the Defined Contribution Pension scheme assets on a 10- year time frame, grew faster than Defined Benefits (CAGR 8.4% pa vs 4.8% pa). Increased member coverage and higher contributions were probable factors responsible for the growth In addition, most retirees might not have enough funds to maintain a decent standard of living, as retirement risk has been transferred to them. 

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Other risks outlined in the summit includeinterest rate risk, political risk, operation risk, and key macroeconomic risks such as unemployment, GDP, inflation, currency among others. 

READ: Is Zenith Bank thriving on the strength of sound financial indices?

With regards to who bears the retirement risk, 68% of the risk is borne from one’s sources, while 38% is from outside sources. 

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The report also stated that the total pension contributions received in the industry from 2017- 2019, was almost equally split between the private and public sectors at the end of Q3 2019 

Explore Economic and Financial Data on the Nairametrics Research Website

Way Forward 

In mitigating the risks inherent in the Nigerian pension industry, experts at the summit called for increased collaboration among stakeholders, engagement with all regulators, increased advocacy for corporate governance, increased awareness, and sensitization of contributors by stakeholders among others as viable options going forward. 

Key Highlights  

  • As of June 2020, only 11.3% of the Nigerian labour force had opened retirement savings accounts (RSAs), while pension assets stand at less than 10% of GDP. 
  • The total number of funds under management currently stands at N11.1 trillion. 
  • There are currently over 9.04 million subscribers and 32 operators. 

READ: Why May was bad for your Pension funds

To view the report, click to download HERE

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Financial Services

Nigerian fintech companies raised $600 million in five years – McKinsey Report 

McKinsey report has revealed that Nigeria’s fintech companies have raised over $600 million in funding in the last six years.

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fintechs, commercial banks, Events in FinTech industry in 2019, Nigeria's fintech industry 2020: The growth frontier of the new decade

In a space of five years, Nigeria’s fintech companies have raised over $600 million in funding, attracting 25($122 million) of the $491.6 million raised by African tech startups in 2019 alone – second only to Kenya, which attracted $149 million.  The period under review is 2014- 2019. 

This information is contained in a recently published report by McKinsey titled Harnessing Nigeria’s Fintech Potential.” The report highlighted the combination of youthful demographic, increasing smartphone penetration, and concerted efforts to driving financial inclusion as factors that interplay to produce conducive and thriving enabler or platform for the fintech firms in Nigeria. 

The report outlined some of the feedback against fintech companies ranging from poor user experience, underwhelming value-added from using some of the financial products, low returns on savings, and limited access to investment opportunities. 

The report also showed that Nigerian fintech companies are primarily focused on payments and consumer lendinghaving allotted an aggregate of 39% on payments to consumers, SMEs, and corporate FSP, and an additional 25% to consumer lending. The breakdown is depicted below. 

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Source: McKinsey report, 2020. 

On the driving factors behind the increasing choice of payment and consumer lending as an area of concentration by fintech companies, a part of the report read thus; 

The factors driving growth in each of these segments vary. Payment-focused solutions have surged over the past two years, spurred in part, by the central bank’s financial inclusion drive and favorable regulatory policies, including revised Know Your Customer (KYC) requirements for lower-tier accounts and incentives, to accelerate development of agent networks across the country. PagaOPayCellulant, and Interswitch’s QuickTeller compete with mobile banking applications and bank unstructured supplementary service data (USSD) channels to send and receive transactions and bill payments. 

Fintech activity in lending is picking up, thanks to the fact that fintechs are able to leverage payment data to determine lending risk more easily, and utilize smartphones as a distribution channel. For example, fintech startups such as Carbon and Renmoney have successfully leveraged alternative credit-scoring algorithms, to provide instant, unsecured, short-term loans to individuals. A few fintechs, such as Migo, have also stepped up to offer unsecured working-capital loans to SMEs with minimal documentation. Banking fintech solutions have been fast followers here, with leading banks launching digital lending platforms like Quick Credit by GTBank and Quickbucks by Access Bank. 

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In general, access, convenience, and trust have all played key roles in the increasing use of fintech products. For example, in the last six months, 54% of consumers have reported increased usage of their fintech products 

Why this matters 

In line with the National Financial Inclusion goals of 2020, and owing to the fact that despite the remarkable progress recorded by traditional banking institutions, the vast majority of consumers are underserved.  Hence, the issue of accessibility especially in remote areas, affordability, and user experience have been a front-burner issue. 

The aforementioned issues have created an opening that fintechs have been quick to take advantage of, providing enhanced propositions across the value chain, to address major points in affordable payments, quick loans, and flexible savings and investments among others. 

Conclusion 

Fintech accounted for only 1.25of retail banking revenues in 2019, signaling a room for development. Despite recording a growth of fintech investments in Nigeria to the tune of approximately $460 million in 2019, majority of these investments were from external investors. This was only a small fraction (1.27%) of the $36 billion invested in fintech globally. 

The report opined that full optimization of fintech companies in Nigeria can stimulate economic activity, by creating a multiplier effect, and can drive progress towards development goals. Economic impact will primarily come from expanding revenue pools and attracting foreign direct investment to the country. The sector can unlock a plethora of economic benefits by driving increased fintech productivity, capital, and labour hours through digitization of financial services.  

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PenCom recovers N17.51billion from defaulting employers, imposes penalties

N17.51 billion was recovered by PenCom from employers who refused to remit pensions from workers’salaries

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Nigeria’s Pension Asset increased by N228 billion in October, PFAs increase investment in infrastructure to N40.52 billion   

The National Pension Commission has recovered N17.51 billion from employers that refused to remit deducted monthly pensions from their workers’ salaries to their Retirement Savings Accounts with the respective Pension Fund Administrators.

This was disclosed by the Commission in its 2020 second quarter report which was released on Friday.

Out of the N17.51 billion, the principal contribution was N8.89 billion, while the penalty imposed on the employers was N8.63 billion.

The report read, “Following the issuance of demand notices to some defaulting employers whose outstanding pension contribution liabilities had been established by the recovery agents, 16 of the affected employers remitted the sum of N261.33 million representing principal contribution of N152.79million and penalty of N108.54million during the quarter. This brought the total recoveries made from inception as at June 30, 2020 to N17.51billion.”

According to the report, one batch of NSITF lump sum payment application totalling N225,442.72 was however received on behalf of five NSITF members during the quarter.

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It said the application was processed and five members’ contributions were transferred to their bank accounts.

Consequently, it added, the cumulative sum of N2.94billion had been paid into the bank accounts of 36,551 NSITF contributors as lump sum/one off payment from inception to June 30.

For the quarter ended June 30, the commission said it processed monthly pension payments totalling N62.25million in respect of 3,629 NSITF pensioners.

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As of June 30, it said the total pension payment to NSITF pensioners amounted to N4.73billion.

The commission added that it reviewed the request for the payment of attributable income to eligible NSITF members and granted a “no objection” for payment of N2.92billion to 165,954 eligible NSITF members whose NSITF contributions were refunded to their RSAs or bank accounts as of December 2018.

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