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Blurb

Penalties: NSE makes over N143.6 million from banks, others in 2019 

NSE boosted its revenue with N143.6 million fines imposed on listed companies across banks, manufacturing, insurance sectors, among others.

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stock, shares, Equity Market down by 0.6% on Monday, Quoted Companies post N4.2 trillion combined profits since 2015, Stockbrokers in Lagos are shifting focus to commodities as stocks underperform, Stock Market gains N204 billion, as effects of OMO restriction kicks in , Penalties: NSE makes over N143.6 million from banks, real sector in 2019 , These companies could soon be delisted from the Nigerian Stock Exchange , C&I Leasing, Oando, UBA, two others top gainers chart on Wednesday, 2020 Nigerian Equities Outlook: Breaking the Jinx?, LASACO, AIICO lead gainers on Wednesday, as bourse dips 0.91% , MTN, Zenith, GTBank lead actively traded stocks on Thursday , Equities: Bearish trades cost the Stock Market N403.02 billion in one week, Blue chips outperform, as All-Share Index up by 9.2% since OMO ban 

The Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) boosted its revenue with N143.6 million fines imposed on listed companies across banks, manufacturing, insurance sectors, among others between January and November of 2019. This is contained in the X-compliance report obtained by Nairametrics from the Stock Exchange.

The report disclosed that while three firms were fined over N8 million for non-disclosure of material information, 15 others were asked to pay N135 million for their failure to file their financial statements by the due date.

Why it matters: Every listed company is required to provide the Exchange with timely information to enable it efficiently perform its function of maintaining an orderly market. In accordance with the provisions of Appendix III: General Undertaking (Equities), Rulebook of The Exchange, 2015 (Issuers’ Rules) and The Exchange’s Circular No. NSE/LARD/LRD/CIR3/17/05/12 on Publication of Announcements or Press Releases via The Issuers’ Portal, listed companies are required to obtain prior written approval from The Exchange before publications that affect shareholders’ interest are made in the media or via the Issuers’ Portal.

Nigerian Stock Exchange, NSE CEO Oscar Onyema, NSE Graduate Trainee Programme, NSE, VAT, Financial market data gulps $28.5 billion from stakeholders, says NSE , NSE lifts R.T. Briscoe’s shares suspension , NSE lifts suspension on Guinea Insurance’s, Niger Insurance’s shares , v

Osar Onyema, Chief Executive Officer, NSE

Details: For non-disclosure of material information, Access Bank Plc, Diamond Bank Plc and First Aluminium Nigeria Plc were fined N4.41 million, N3.24 million and N476,280, respectively. Access Bank and the defunct Diamond Bank were penalised for non-disclosure of resolutions passed at their board meetings while First Aluminium was penalised for non-dispatch of the notice of its annual general meeting and annual reports to shareholders 21 days before the date of the meeting.

Failure to file financial statements: Grief Nigeria Plc, Union Bank Nigeria Plc, Afromedia Plc, Conoil Plc, Lasaco Assurance Plc, Flour Mills of Nigeria Plc, Universal Insurance Plc and Thomas Wyatt Nigeria Plc and others were fined. In this category, Amino International got the highest fine of N41.1 million as it failed to file its financial statements since 2015.

  • R.T Briscoe was fined N31.3 million for the delay in filing its 2018 audited financial statement, first and second quarter of 2019 financial statements.
  • Niger Insurance and Guinea Insurance were fined N19.8 million and N19.2 million, respectively, for failing to file their full-year 2018, first quarter 2019 and second quarter 2019 financial statements as and when due.
  • Royal Exchange, Thomas Wyatt and Lasaco Assurance were respectively fined N8.9 million, N4.9 million and N1.4 million, for failing to file their audited 2018 and first quarter 2019 financial statements while Universal Insurance got a fine of N5 million for failing to audit 2018, first and second quarter 2019 financial statements.
  • NSE slammed N800,000, N200,000, N400,000 and N400,000 on Grief Nigeria, Union Bank, Afromedia and Conoil for the delay in filing their 2018 financial statements.
  • Flour Mills of Nigeria, Access Bank and Interlinked Technologies received respective penalties of N1.2 million, N700,000 and N200,000 for failing to file the financial statements for the first quarter, second quarter and second quarter of 2019 respectively.

[READ MORE: NSE highlights the importance of the capital market in achieving SDGs)

Meanwhile, some shareholders of the companies, who spoke with our analyst in separate interviews, praised the management of the Stock Exchange for being strict on its compliance exercise as they called for the punishment of erring companies.

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National President, Constance Shareholders Association of Nigeria, Shehu Mikail, agreed that the companies should be fined but urged the Exchange to ensure such fines are not deducted from the shareholders’ fund, which to him, would create holes in the investment pockets in the companies.

President, Progressive Shareholders Association of Nigeria, Mr Boniface Okezie, lamented that the incessant penalties on companies were discouraging companies from seeking quotation on the nation’s bourse, thereby affecting the growth and development of the market. He added that the market regulators must pursue friendly policies and initiatives to put the market forward.

Abiola has spent about 14 years in journalism. His career has covered some top local print media like TELL Magazine, Broad Street Journal, The Point Newspaper.The Bloomberg MEI alumni has interviewed some of the most influential figures of the IMF, G-20 Summit, Pre-G20 Central Bank Governors and Finance Ministers, Critical Communication World Conference.The multiple award winner is variously trained in business and markets journalism at Lagos Business School, and Pan-Atlantic University. You may contact him via email - [email protected]

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    Blurb

    Buy what? Dangote vs BUA Cement

    Dangote Cement has a market capitalization of N3.65 trillion, while BUA posts a N2.49 trillion capitalization, but does size win?

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    I want to review the performance of the largest quoted companies in Nigeria.

    On the Nigerian Stock Exchange, they don’t come any bigger than Dangote Cement (Dangote) and BUA Cement (BUA). Only MTNN stands with both cement companies in terms of market capitalization. Dangote and BUA are both blue-chip companies, in the same sector and both enjoy federal import protection, they also both serve a local market with huge demand for cement.

    Which is a better investment? Let us assume I have N100,000.00 (One Hundred Thousand Naira,) which should I buy? Let us review both stocks with FY 2020 results they posted. For consistency, I am going to use my trading view terminal numbers.

    READ: Dangote Cement joins MTN in the trillion-naira club, as 2020 revenue surpassed N1 trillion

    Market Capitalization

    First, we talk about capitalization, (Market cap is the number of shares issued x market value of shares ). Dangote Cement has a market capitalization of N3.65 trillion, while BUA posts a N2.49 trillion capitalization. Does size win? Dangote is bigger? Not yet!

    Market Price

    With N100,000 I can buy about 465 shares of Dangote at N215 a share and 1,360 shares of BUA at N73.50 per share. Is BUA cheaper? do we have a winner? Not quite. Let us dig deeper.

    Dangote Cement posted a Net Income figure of N276 billion, if we divide this earning by the number of issued shares which is 17 billion, we get an Earnings Per Share (EPS) of N16.14, so every share of Dangote Cement earns (not pays) the investors N16. Similarly, the Earning Per Share of BUA is N2.0

    READ: BUA Cement loses N162 billion in market value in a week

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    Thus when I buy Dangote Cement N215 per share, I am buying 16 times the earnings of Dangote. We can simplify this by simply comparing the price I pay per share of Dangote to the EPS of Dangote (Price to Earnings Ratio), thus I invest my cash of N215 to buy 16 times the earnings of Dangote, thus the Price to Earnings Ratio of Dangote is 13.31 (P/E). Using the same calculation, the price for each earnings of BUA (the P.E.) is 35.38. This means even though I am paying more cash for each share of Dangote, I am paying less to buy the earnings of Dangote, thus Dangote is cheaper than BUA.

    So our first milestone is reached, we have used the Net Income, Market Price, and Number of Issued shared to get the Earnings Per Share, we have then determined what amount of earnings we are buying to determine which stock is at a bargain.

    READ: Oba Otudeko’s stakes in Firstbank and Honeywell are worth over N10 billion

    What else?

    Let us look at the earnings that will be paid in cash. Remember, Earnings, is just the Net Income of Dangote, we as equity holders have the opportunity to share in any portion of the Net Income.

    Dangote in 2020 paid out from earnings N272.69 billion as dividends, this translates to about N16 per share or in terms of returns 7.44%. We get this Dividend Yield return by comparing the dividend paid to the market price per share (D/P). BUA also in 2020 paid out N59.26 billion as dividends from earnings, this translates to a dividend yield of 2.81%.

    Stanbic 728 x 90

    So, if I invested N100,000 in shares of Dangote Cement, I would earn a cash return of 7.44%, if I did the same with BUA I would earn a cash return of 2.81%.

    READ: Jumia: In search of the elusive break-even sales

    Let us go a bit deeper…

    When you buy a stock, you are buying into the earnings and cash flow. Dangote Cement in 2020 earned N276 billion and paid N272 billion as dividends meaning they retained about N3 billion for that FY while generating over N248b in Free Cash Flow. Similarly, BUA earned a net N71.52 billion, paid out N59 billion in dividends, retained N19 billion but posted a negative Free Cash Flow of (N95.49 billion). Should BUA cement have simply used that cash to finance working capital rather than paying it as dividends? Perhaps. Let us speak more of Cash flow.

    Cash retained is cash not paid to you the investor. You have to ask how well your company is utilizing that cash retained. Should it all be paid out as dividends? Or retained in the company to fund expansion and growth?

    READ: Three things Nigerians can learn from Warren Buffet’s latest letter

    Look at it this way, if Federal Government Bonds were offering a Yield of 15% and we see that Dangote is offering a yield of 7.44%, then as shareholders you should demand that Dangote pays more cash to you to allow you to invest in FGN bonds because you get a higher return (at lower risk). The point is any company retaining cash or paying cash at a lower yield than the market is hurting the investors, who are missing the opportunity of investing higher elsewhere.

    Let us score both company managers by how well they have managed the revenues and capital of the companies

     

     Return on Assets %Return on Equity %Return on Invested Capital %EBITA Margin %Net Margin %Debt to AssetsLong Term Debt to Assets
    Dangote Cement14.6231.2126.9244.0424.310.240.08
    BUA Cement11.1519.1215.3541.8732.030.360.23
    FY 2020

    Across the board, the management of Dangote Cement has done a better job when compared to BUA Cement in managing the assets of the company. Dangote Return on invested capital is higher with a much lower recourse to debt and of course a higher FCF number.

    Overall, on Earning, Returns and Efficiency, it appears Dangote Cement posts better fundamentals…

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    Do follow @FinPlanKaluAja1

    This is not investment advice, this is not a recommendation to buy or sell. Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance. Speak with your adviser before investing. Equity is risky.

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    Blurb

    Is something fishy going on at Custodian Plc?

    Custodian stock hit a year high just as it announced a Convertible Loan Instrument set to be approved at its AGM.

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    Custodian Investment Plc. announces board meeting and closed period, Custodian Investment Plc. announces board meeting and closed period

    Custodian Plc, one of the largest insurance companies in Nigeria is currently trading at a new year high of N7.10 and is up 21% year to date. Nairametrics Blurb team has in recent days noticed an upsurge in its share price especially since the company announced its AGM.

    As we pen this article, about 2.9 million units have exchanged hand at a share price of N7.

    The stock is included in the Pension Index and by some measure quite illiquid. It is also one of the stocks recommended in our Premium Service Stock Select Newsletter thus the need for further introspection.

    READ: Buy what? GTBank vs Zenith Bank

    Custodian Investment AGM

    Typically, when companies announce AGMs we are keenly curious as this is where decisions that can ultimately affect shareholders (especially smaller retail investors) are approved.

    In its recent filings, the company stated as follows in item 10.

    That the Board of Directors of the Company be and is hereby authorised to:

    (a) raise the Naira equivalent of up to $15,000,000.00 (Fifteen Million US Dollars), as additional capital through a convertible loan instrument;

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    (b) convert the loan in the Naira equivalent of up to $15,000,000.00 (Fifteen Million US Dollars) into shares in the Company (the “Conversion Shares”) at a conversion price, being the higher of N6 per share or the 12-month historical average daily share price of the Company derived from the Daily Official List of The Nigerian Stock Exchange (for the period ending on March 23, 2021), subject to adjustment upon the occurrence of certain adjustment events;

    (c) allot the Converted Shares to the Lender upon the exercise by the Lender of its right to convert the Loan into shares in the Company, subject to applicable law; and

    (d) take steps necessary or reasonably desirable to give effect to the foregoing resolutions and for effecting any transactions pursuant thereto, including the appointment of professional advisers, and the obtention of relevant regulatory approvals.

    READ: Notore Chemicals is swimming in debts – company to access equity market in Q2 2021

    What this means?

    In simple English, the directors of Custodian are seeking the approval of its shareholders to borrow $15 million (N6.1 billion) in convertible loan instrument.

    Stanbic 728 x 90

    A convertible loan instrument is simply a loan that you can convert into shares if the lender so wishes. The share price for conversion are predetermined and in this case, they stated N6 per share or the 12-month historical average daily share price of the company’s stock.

    If the lender does decide to convert the loans to shares at the current share price of N6 per share, it means about 1 billion shares will be offered to the lender, an equivalent of 17.4% of the total outstanding shares of the company. This loan is in effect, a potential dilution of existing shareholders of the company if it is approved at the AGM.

    So why is the company seeking a convertible loan or even diluting its shareholders?

    READ: Gains on quoted investment stocks rescued Custodian Investment Plc from loss in Q3 2020

    Fishing around for why

    Typically when a company decides to raise money via a convertible loan instrument, they are looking for lower interest rates, debt that avoids the burden of periodic repayment, and/or looking to delay when the actual equity is issued. There are also tax considerations at play but not as significant as the ones mentioned above.

    Except, Custodian is looking to purchase another asset, after it bought UPDC, we do not understand why it will be looking to raise capital huge enough to dilute existing shareholders. It also did not explain why it is seeking to raise the said capital in its AGM Notice, a slight departure from the norm in cases like this.

    • Custodian is also highly capitalized with a Net Asset of about N46 billion and a balance sheet size of N176.1 billion (after the acquisition of UPDC) as of 2020.
    • Suffice to add that the company recently paid shareholders about N2.6 billion in dividends, making us wonder why it is seeking to dilute shareholders when it could have just ploughed that amount to its capital raising needs.
    • In fact, the dividends paid in 2020 was just 21% of profits, meaning it had retained about N10 billion in profits made during the year. Again, why does it need N6.1 billion in loans?
    • Custodian also has a thriving insurance business which fetched it about N58 billion in gross premium income out of which N32 billion was from non-life. Again, why does it need N6.1 billion on convertible loans?
    • The company currently carries a debt of about N5.5 billion which was inherited from its acquisition of UPDC. The debt is mostly a bond issued at an interest rate of 16% per annum and due for full liquidation in 2023.
    • There is no rush to pay down this debt.

    READ: NPF Microfinance vs C&I Leasing: A tale of two rights offer

    What then?

    We are lost as to why the company is looking to raise this capital and can only now think of two reasons. Firstly, could it be the existing shareholders looking to tighten their stake in the company? Custodian’s majority shareholders are Gratitude Capital Limited and Mikeade Investments Limited with 22.48% and 15.72% respectively.

    • The company CEO Oluwole Oshin represents Gratitude Capital while Business Mogul Micheal Ade (Elizade) owns Mikeade Investments Limited. Could it be either of these two investors looking to up their stakes?
    • There could also be a reason for this back door approach. About 74.5% of the company is owned by just 20 shareholders so it is clear that increasing majority stake will be difficult to achieve.
    • The other reason is perhaps an institutional investor looking to acquire a significant stake in the company through the backdoor. Is this plausible?

    READ: Investors react to Fidelity’s bond listing, as it gains N1.74 billion

    Well, these are speculations that only Cusdotian can confirm. We hope they do so as soon as possible.

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