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Nigerians react as some Chicken Republic outlets go ‘out of stock for chicken’

Chicken Republic is currently the butt of joke after some of its outlets reportedly told customers that the company was out of chicken. 

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Nigerians react as some Chicken Republic outlets go 'out of stock for chicken'

Chicken Republic is currently the butt of joke among Nigerians after some of its outlets reportedly told customers, including Nollywood Actress, Funke Akindele, that the company was out of chicken. 

The response of the quick-service restaurant to orders by customers was a shocker. It’s like telecommunication companies telling their customers they are out of airtime. Although Chicken isn’t the only delicacy sold by Chicken Republic, who wants to order rice without complementing it with Chicken? 

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While such rhetoric is common at Nigerian wedding receptions where meat is often exhausted before rice, such is not expected of Chicken Republic. The company is trending on Social Media platform, Twitter even though only a few of its outlets are reportedly out of chicken. 

Nigerians react as some Chicken Republic outlets go 'out of stock for chicken'

A Nairametrics staff, who visited one of Chicken Republic outlets in Magodo, Lagos, was told the same thing – “no chicken”.

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When he requested for available alternatives, the attendant replied, “We have chips.”

Is the border closure the reason? 

This disclosure by some outlets of Chicken Republic is happening at a time the Nigerian land borders are closed. The borders have been closed since October and are not expected to open until January 2020. 

The border closure has affected several businesses because the closure was sudden and President Muhammadu Buhari didn’t give traders, producers, and other businesses the time to prepare for its impact. This affected the price of foodstuffs across Nigeria, with Chicken price skyrocketing beyond control. 

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[READ MORE: Border closure retaliation: Nigerian goods get dumped by West African countries]

This is because the border closure prevented importation of Chicken from neighbouring African countries. The only available option was the local Chicken. This caused high demand which resulted in a surge in price. Nairametrics had reported that poultry owners increased prices and told the government not to open the borders. 

So, is the price offered by poultry owners in Nigeria affecting Chicken Republic or is it just a one-off situation? 

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It is a good and bad problem

Chicken Republic operates in a competitive market in Nigeria. The country is flooded with several quick-service restaurants, both local and foreign, including Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC), The PlaceMr. BiggsTasty Fried Chicken (TFC), and many local restaurants. The competitors of the company will take advantage of the situation, as customers will be looking for available options in their areas. 

So, while the situation is currently bad for some of Chicken Republic outlets, the opposite is the case for its market rivals. Actress Funke Akindele said she opted for another local outlet when she was informed of the situation. Twitter users are already suggesting that Chicken Republic should borrow chicken from its rivals in order to meet demand. 

Reactions from Nigerians 

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[READ ALSO: Nigeria’s decision to ban petrol delivery to border petrol stations is taking its toll]

https://twitter.com/Misterkobz/status/1196416631632740358

Patricia

Olalekan is a certified media practitioner from the Nigerian Institute of Journalism (NIJ). In the era of media convergence, Olalekan is a valuable asset, with ability to curate and broadcast news. His zeal to write was developed out of passion to shape people’s thought and opinion; serving as a guideline for their daily lives. Contact for tips: [email protected]

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Stanley

    November 18, 2019 at 6:38 pm

    I think it’s either that the company used to import a good portion of their chicken or that their local poultry supplier has run out of stock due to the increased demand on local producers. Rather than keep increasing prices, local producers should take advantage of the situation to scale up their production, else there would always be agitation by consumers for the government to re-open the importation floodgates due to lack of capacity of local producers to meet local demand for chicken.

  2. Olalere Ojo

    November 19, 2019 at 6:28 am

    Think this is an opportunity for chicken republic its self to diversify and invest in poultry farm which should have being their major source of raw material for their restaurant all this while,
    We really needs to build our own industry and stop building others for them.
    Investment Opportunity is now available for both chicken republic and other restaurant now, thanks to the government for the border closure, because now there is job opportunity for the youth in that sector.

  3. Aniekan Ezekiel

    November 19, 2019 at 2:45 pm

    It’s somewhat ironic for a quick service restaurant branded Chicken Republic to claim that they don’t have or they’re out of chicken. It’s not a situation that the brand should have allowed to happen.

    The business should have reviewed the situation and taken a decision on whether to keep outlets that are out of chicken closed until they have restocked or to put out a carefully crafted statement to suggest that they’re experimenting on meals without chickens at a few of their outlets and would welcome customer feedback on their experience of not finding chicken on the menu in a Chicken Republic outlet.

    With a statement like that they wouldn’t leave it to the hapless on-the-ground staff to be giving out answers and responses that are totally embarrassing to the brand.

  4. Kayode

    November 21, 2019 at 7:22 pm

    It’s an absurdity infact a complete aberration that their is no chicken in Chicken Republic. Why is then called Chicken Republic? I wondered !!!

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Economy & Politics

Nigeria’s debt rises to $79.5 billion, as debt to revenue ratio worsens

According to data obtained from DMO, $27.66 billion (N9.9 trillion) is the total external debt.

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DMO suspends April 2020 FGN savings bond offer

Nigeria, Africa’s largest economy’s total public debt rose to $79.5 billion (N28.63 trillion) as of the first quarter of 2020, which is March 31, 2020. This represents a 15% increase from the figure that was recorded for the corresponding period in 2019, which was about $69.09 billion (N24.94 trillion).

This was disclosed in a latest publication by the Debt Management Office (DMO) on Friday June 3, 2020.

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Nigeria has seen its debt stock rise sharply in recent years as the country tries to fund infrastructural and developmental projects and boost its fragile economy, which has been in and out of recession. The country’s economy has been projected to fall into recession again, due to the adverse impact of COVID-19 that has seen oil prices crash globally.

According to data obtained from DMO, $27.66 billion (N9.9 trillion) is the total external debt. This represents 34.89% of the total public debt stock. Whereas, $51.64 billion (N18.64 trillion) is the total domestic debt, which represents 65.11% of the total public debt.

The Federal Government accounts for 50.77% of the total domestic debt, which is $40.26 billion (N14.53 trillion), whereas the State Governments and Federal Capital Territory account for 14.34% of the total domestic debt which is $11.37 billion (N4.11 trillion).

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Nigeria has been under a lot of fiscal crisis following the crash of oil prices triggered by the coronavirus pandemic. The oil sector accounts for about 90% of the country’s foreign exchange earnings and about 60% of its total revenue.

The country, which had lined up a series of debt issue this year, had to halt the external commercial borrowing due to oil price collapse. The Minister for Finance, Zainab Ahmed, had last week disclosed that the country would no longer go ahead with its Eurobond debt issue.

The Nigerian government, for now, is focusing on the domestic markets and concessionary loans to help fund the 2020 budget deficit which is made worse by drop in revenue. In the recently approved 2020 revised budget, the federal government is expected to borrow N850 billion from the domestic market.

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This rising debt has put a lot of pressure on the government’s resources as it spent $1.69 billion (N609,13 billion) to service its domestic debt in the first quarter of 2020 alone.

Nairametrics had reported that Nigeria’s global rating is at risk due to the sharp rise in the country’s sovereign debt and a growing finance gap. According to a report from the global rating agency, Fitch Ratings, this could trigger a rating downgrade as policymakers struggle to stimulate growth and deal with the impact of low oil prices and sharp drop in revenue.

According to Fitch, the country’s debt to revenue ration is set to deteriorate further to 538% by the end of 2020, from the 348% that it was a year earlier.

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Financial Services

CBN imposes fresh CRR debits on banks to the tune of N118 billion

These debits have inevitably tightened liquidity in the banking system and bankers are complaining.

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CRR Debits

On July 3rd, 2020, the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) once again debited many banks in Nigeria in line with its Cash Reserve Ratio (CRR) compliance requirement. This time around, about 14 banks were debited to the tune of N118 billion.

These banks are:

  • Access Bank Plc: N3 billion
  • Guaranty Trust Bank Plc: N15 billion
  • First Bank of Nigeria Ltd: N12.4 billion
  • Ecobank Nigeria: N7 billion
  • Sterling Bank Plc: N5 billion
  • Fidelity Bank Plc: N11 billion
  • Union Bank of Nigeria Plc: N12.5 billion
  • First City Monument Bank Ltd: N10 billion
  • CitiBank Nigeria Ltd: N10.2 billion
  • Stanbic IBTC Bank: N15 billion
  • Zenith Bank Plc: N7 billion
  • Wema Bank Plc: N3 billion
  • Titan Trust Bank: N2.5 billion
  • Rand Merchant Bank Nigeria Ltd: N4 billion

More details on these debits

These constant CRR debits, which typically herald the apex bank’s FX auctions as Nairametrics was made to understand, have served to significantly reduce liquidity in the system. An insider who informed Nairametrics about the latest debit said “the liquidity within the system is now very tight”. As a matter of fact, liquidity is now reportedly below N100 billion.

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Apparently, the CBN is using these weekly CRR debits to mop up liquidity in the system. In other words, these debits help to prevent banks from coming to the FX auctions with lots of cash. Too much FX demands tend to put the apex bank under pressure.

Note that inasmuch as the CBN is trying hard to stabilise the FX markets, these constant debits have inevitably affected banks negatively by leaving them cash-strapped. Our source, who was quoted above, earlier complained about these ‘indiscriminate debits’ when he said:

“These are huge amounts that are leaving the banking sector. It’s a squeeze on the banks. A bank like First Bank, for instance, has about N1.4 trillion in CRR with the Central Bank. And there is Zenith Bank with equally as much as N1.5 trillion. These are monies that banks can potentially put in loans at 52% at 30%, or even put in money market instruments at maybe 10%. So, for a shareholder of these banks, this CRR debits are impairing the banks’ ability to increase their earnings because now are not able to use the funds that are legitimately theirs to create money for their shareholders. And the question is that under what framework is the Central Bank choosing to take people’s money?”

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Banks’ stakeholders have also collectively complained

Meanwhile, bank stakeholders have also collectively complained about these incessant CRR debits by the Central Bank of Nigeria. As Nairametrics reported yesterday, the negative impacts of CBN’s constant CRR debits were among some of the issues raised by banks’ stakeholders during Standard Chartered Bank’s 2020 Africa Investor’s Conference.

It is important to point out that many banks in the country, including the likes of First Bank, now have billions of their customers’ debits sterilised for the sake of CRR compliance.

Understanding CRR

The cash reserve requirement is the minimum amount banks are expected to leave retained with the Central Bank of Nigeria from customer deposits. In January, the CRR was increased by 5% to 27.5%  by the CBN Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) who explained that the decision was intended to address monetary-induced inflation whilst retaining the benefits from the CBN’s LDR policy.

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Columnists

Top Nigerian FinTech Apps that are leading the competition

It is estimated that there are about 210-250 fintech operators/companies operating in the Nigerian space.

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Top Nigerian FinTech Apps that are leading the competition

Financial technology is one of the new waves of disruptions in the financial sector, that is fuelled by the internet of things and the increasing digitalisation of the world. In the last decade, the industry has grown by more than 100 times from $1.8billion in 2010 to $19billion in 2015. Recently, the size of the global FinTech industry has been valued at $127.66 billion and is expected to grow at an annual average of 24% to amount to $309.98 billion by 2022. 

Fintech refers to the ecosystem where technology companies as well as financial institutions use the innovations in technology to foster financial services and increase access to finance in the market. It an umbrella term that refers to the innovations in technology that are challenging and changing the traditional approaches in the financial service industry. 

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Almost every corner of the world has been touched by FinTech in as little as 20-25 years of its existence with the likes of PayPal charging at the front by helping people make seamless money transfers across the world and facilitating online payments. In almost every mention of FinTech in Africa, the name m-Pesa is mentioned under the same breathe. Founded in 2007,  M-Pesa helps Kenyans make all money transfers and payments online even allow for deposits and withdrawals with the ease of a mobile app.

READ ALSO: Chipper Cash just raised $13.8 million Series A funding

The advent of FinTechs in Nigeria and regulations

In Nigeria, the presence of FinTech is equally notable, and like its ecosystem, there is a continuous rise in the number of FinTech startups looking to offer better services than pre-existing ones. FinTechs in Nigeria are looking to expand the tentacles of the financial sector to reach its un-banked population of 60 million people (more than a quarter of its estimated 200 million population) through mobile apps that make services.

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Also, they are looking to make an array of financial services more available to the banked population by providing seamless services like promising interests on savings and investment more than traditional banking. It is estimated that there are about 210-250 FinTech operators/companies operating in the Nigerian space, and these players brought about the valuation of the industry to $153.1 million in 2017 and are projected to rise up to $543.3 million by 2022.

Regulation of FinTech in Nigeria is overseen by the Central bank. As a measure of risk management, the CBN places a financial barrier of a minimum of $275,000 on entry into the FinTech market to help secure funds and credibility of operators.

Categories of FinTech

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As earlier noted, the term FinTech is an umbrella term. It is an ecosystem with many species of habitats. These species are the different sectors in the finance industry from insurance to banking to investment to money transfers and other emerging areas like cryptocurrencies and Agritech.

This paper focuses on five categories for the Nigerian market: Agritech, Savings, and Investments (financial instruments), Crowdfunding, Mobile Payments, and Cryptocurrencies. In ranking the top players in each category, this paper will base its ranking on google play store’s data.

READ ALSO: Just In: Opay shuts down other business arms to focus mainly on fintech

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Agritech: Farm Crowdy

In FinTech, agrotech is the use of internet technology to close the funding gap and infrastructural deficits plaguing the agricultural sector. They look to help farmers feed the world, cutting off middlemen and making farming more profitable. Most notably, it is a crowdfunding platform that allows investors to make short-term harvest cycle investments in agriculture and reap high interests.

As the first digital agriculture platform in Nigeria, Farm Crowdy has succeeded in keeping its first position in the industry by providing a platform that connects small-scale farmers with prospective investors who do not necessarily need to know about agriculture to invest. In allocated funds to small-scale farmers that helps them increase their output by adopting capital intensive/mechanised farming, providing them seedlings, training on crop yields, access to more farmlands, and providing insurance for agric products.

Since its launch in 2016, Farm Crowdy has helped 25,837 farmers, provided over 16,000 acres for farming, gained nearly 70,000 farm sponsorships from investors, reared more than 2.5 million chickens, and pays investors 13-25% returns on their investment. On google play store, Farm Crowdy is ranked 3.5 stars with 265 reviews and has over 50,000 downloads. Cumulatively, it has nearly a hundred thousand active users.

Other Agritech platforms that offer similar services include Thrive Agric, Growsel, Pork Money (which is crowdfunding for a pig farm), Requid, Agropack, Releaf, FarmNGA, Probity Farms, among many others.


Savings and Investment:

Piggyvest

Fintechs in Nigeria offers investment platforms that tend to bridge the knowledge gap in investments in financial instruments, eliminating information asymmetry,  and reducing the hassles associated with financial instruments. In the Nigerian space, the savings and investment subsector is one of the most populated by fintech firms, among which the most dominant factor in this section is the Piggyvest app.

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Piggyvest offers users the financial freedom to not only save responsibly but put their savings into use by investing them. It launched in 2016 as a savings platform – Piggybank – and later rebranded to include investments – Piggyvest. It prides itself as the first online savings and investment platform in West Africa and boasts of 350,000 active users.

Piggyvest promises users 10-13% interest rates on their savings and up to 25% on investment in financial securities. At just two years into the business, Piggybank announced that it had raised $1.1 million in seed fund, and saw a growth in savings rate by up to 3000% between 2016 and 2017. On Google play store, it records more than 500,000 downloads which are about five times more than its two closer competing savings and investment platforms like Cowerywise and i-invest (100k+ each). It also ranked 4.7 stars with 20,000 reviews. 

READ MORE: 11 money saving apps you need to download now

Wealth.ng

While the aforementioned fintech companies have gained ground in the demand for fintech services, Wealth.ng is introducing high-scale innovation into the market. Recently it entered into a partnership deed with Paga, one of the dominant names in the money transfer sector of the industry, to improve the quality and efficiency of service delivery. Among the industry, there are hardly any existing partnerships, instead, each company competes for customer acquisition and better service.

Wealth.ng sees business differently. A decade ago, many people would dismiss the thought of investing in financial securities for lack of adequate knowledge of how it works or understanding of the trends. Wealth.ng has completely bridged this gap by including consumer education as part of its services. With this, they walk potential investors through every step and provide an array of investment options for each person.

Other players in the savings and investment subsector include Afrinvest, Wealthdotng, Kudi, Investment one, Payday investor, and many others.


Mobile Payments: Interswitch

This is no doubt the busiest in the FinTech industry in Nigeria, and one of the top FinTech areas globally. According to the Central Bank, between January to December 2019, the volume of transactions via mobile monies stood at 377,265,208 which reflects a transaction value of N5 trillion. The FinTech company at the forefront of this charge is Interswitch. In 2019, it sold a 20% share of the company to Visa for $200 million which brought the company’s valuation to $1 billion (N360 billion) – a unicorn status. At this valuation, it surpasses giant financial houses like Access bank (N327 billion), and UBA (N227 billion).

Unlike savings and investment platforms that people use for savings from time to time – hence mobile apps, mobile payment apps are used for the likes of utility bills, cash transfers, deposits, and withdrawals. Businesses use mobile payment platforms for transaction purposes. However, on play store, Interswitch still boasts of more than 100,000 downloads in its quickteller app and over 50,000 downloads in its quickteller agent app, which top other of its complementary payment apps for Nigeria and other African countries.

READ MORE: Digitization of the U.S Dollar faces U.S Senate hearing

Other major players in the payment platform in Nigeria include Flutterwave, Paystack, Remita, e-transact, Vogue Pay, among others.


Cryptocurrencies: Quidax

To many people, cryptocurrencies are still a mirage. As such, investing in any form of cryptocurrency would be considered a wasteful investment. In the Nigerian fintech ecosystem for cryptocurrencies, Quidax is helping cryptocurrency spreading the knowledge and raising awareness for cryptocurrencies, and helping enthusiasts and investors make crypto investments.

Launched in 2018, Quidax has made its platform seamless for trading different cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, Litecoin, and other cryptocurrencies using the naira. Its market approach of trading directly with naira and boycotting exchange rate variations is a major development in the crypto market. One year after it started, CEO Buchi Okoro said they saw a transaction volume of more than $110 million from users in 70 countries from 6 continents. On play store, it has over 10,000 downloads and rated a 4.1 star.


Crowdfunding: NaijaFund

As an alternative to raising funds for personal and business projects like hospital bills, school fees, and the likes, crowdfunding platforms help users source funds from a sea of ‘strangers’ willing to spare some funds to help out. On the global scale, GoFundMe leads other crowdfunding platforms by ensuring a transparent system where people seeking for financial assistance could present their ordeals and receive solidarity.

Although GoFundMe shares a strong presence in almost every country, it doesn’t deter other industry players from participating. In Nigeria, NaijaFund presents itself as one of the foremost indigenous crowdfunding platforms. Although mainly present as a web app, it has since its 2016 launch helped Nigerians bridge the funding gap for personal and business projects, in which it claims 10% of the total funds raised. 

 

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