Connect with us
nairametrics
UBA ads

Business News

Patronage of Ghanaian goods spike despite border closure 

Ghanaian goods and services have recorded high patronage at the ongoing International Trade Fair situated at the Tafewa Balewa Square.

Published

on

Patronage of Ghanaian goods spike despite border closure 

Ghanaian goods and services have recorded high patronage at the ongoing International Trade Fair  at the Tafewa Balewa Square. This is despite the closure of the Nigerian land borders and the disagreement between the Ghana Union of Traders Association (GUTA) and foreign traders.

The Details: This information was disclosed in an interview granted by Catherine Gordor, the Senior Export Development Officer, Research and International Cooperation of the Ghana Export Promotion Authority (GEPA) to Nairametrics at the Fair.

UBA ADS

Gordor gave details of the volume of trade transactions that occurred between Friday, 1st and Tuesday 5th November. She noted that the weekend was the busiest day of the fair as Ghana recorded several commercial activities.

Today and the weekend, Saturday, Sunday are the busiest days we had so far. The weekend was very busy. Today, we least expected this but we have seen a lot of activities going on.”

GTBank 728 x 90

High patronage of Ghanaian goods

She added that the highest patronage recorded for Ghanaian goods at the fair was from Nigerians.

Everybody is here, however, the percentage of nationals that have patronised Ghanaian products are 60% Nigerians and 10% Cameroonian.” She also added that garments had gotten a lot of patronages.

Reacting to President Muhammadu Buhari’s directive to keep the borders closed, Gordor said Ghanaians could do nothing about Nigeria’s decisions as it was the path the country chose.

onebank728 x 90

On the issue of the closure of foreign shops at Opera Square in Accra, Gordor said it happened as result of a little misunderstanding between traders. “It was a little misunderstanding between traders that has been resolved.”

Gordor, however, stressed that Ghana would continue to trade with Nigeria despite the disagreements regarding the closure of the border.

Why shouldn’t you trade with us? In West Africa, Ghana and Nigeria are seen as twins. Wherever you see Ghana, you see Nigeria. Wherever you see Nigerians, you see Ghanaians.

app
GTBank 728 x 90

https://nairametrics.com/2019/11/01/border-closure-retaliation-ghanaian-traders-union-shuts-nigerian-shops-to-clamp-down-on-more/

Backstory

Recall the Federal Government of Nigeria ordered the complete closure of the Nigerian border, placing a ban on both legitimate and illegitimate movement of goods in and out of the country.

This came after the President announced the partial closure of the Nigeria-Benin border on August 20th with the exercise code-named, ‘Ex-Swift Response’. The measure was taken to restrict the massive illegal importation of rice into Nigeria and ensure trans-border security issues.

Subsequently, Ghana moved to beg Nigeria to open its borders but Nigeria refused to yield to their request. This forced aggrieved members of the Ghana Union of Traders Association (GUTA) to threaten to boycott Nigerian made goods.

Just recently, shops owned by Nigerians in five markets located in Kumasi, Ghana, were shut by the Ghana Union of Traders Association (GUTA).

app

Patricia

Reincarnated as a lover of stocks, Angel investors, seed funds, and anything aligned to tech or startups raising money, Joseph's work at Nairametrics involves following the money to wherever it leads. Before joining Nairametrics, he won an investigative journalism fellowship with ICIR, appeared in several national dallies, with hard-hitting opinions, features and investigative pieces. He has also engaged in content marketing and copywriting for a top e-commerce firm in Nigeria.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Coronavirus

Governor David Umahi of Ebonyi tests positive for COVID-19

Umahi has directed those who worked in the budget review for 2020 to immediately test for COVID-19.

Published

on

Ebonyi State workers will not get salaries for this reason

The Governor of Ebonyi State, David Umahi has tested positive for COVID-19, reported on Saturday afternoon.

Umahi’s Special Assistant on Media, Mr. Francis Nwaze, confirmed the news and also revealed that some associates of the governor also tested positive.

UBA ADS

He also said that the Governor is not showing any symptoms of the disease, though he has isolated himself in line with the NCDC protocols.

“The governor has directed his Deputy, Dr Kelechi, to coordinate the state’s fight against the disease and appealed to the citizens to take the NCDC protocols seriously.

“He will currently be working from ‘home’ and will be conducting all meetings virtually,” Nwaze added.

GTBank 728 x 90

David Umahi becomes the sixth Nigerian governor to test positive for the disease, Governors of Kaduna, El- Rufai, Bauchi, Bala Mohammed and Oyo, Seyi Makinde have fully recovered while the recent cases have been the Governors of Ondo, Rotimi Akeredolu and Delta, Ifeanyi Okowa.

On Thursday, Governor Umahi announced that the state’s Executive Council was finalizing the budget review required by World Bank and said “most us broke down and are being treated of malaria.”

He also directed those who worked in the budget review for 2020 to immediately test for COVID-19 and admitted he is expecting a second test result after he initially tested negative in March.

onebank728 x 90

Patricia
Continue Reading

Economy & Politics

Nigeria’s debt rises to $79.5 billion, as debt to revenue ratio worsens

According to data obtained from DMO, $27.66 billion (N9.9 trillion) is the total external debt.

Published

on

DMO suspends April 2020 FGN savings bond offer

Nigeria, Africa’s largest economy’s total public debt rose to $79.5 billion (N28.63 trillion) as of the first quarter of 2020, which is March 31, 2020. This represents a 15% increase from the figure that was recorded for the corresponding period in 2019, which was about $69.09 billion (N24.94 trillion).

This was disclosed in a latest publication by the Debt Management Office (DMO) on Friday June 3, 2020.

UBA ADS

Nigeria has seen its debt stock rise sharply in recent years as the country tries to fund infrastructural and developmental projects and boost its fragile economy, which has been in and out of recession. The country’s economy has been projected to fall into recession again, due to the adverse impact of COVID-19 that has seen oil prices crash globally.

According to data obtained from DMO, $27.66 billion (N9.9 trillion) is the total external debt. This represents 34.89% of the total public debt stock. Whereas, $51.64 billion (N18.64 trillion) is the total domestic debt, which represents 65.11% of the total public debt.

The Federal Government accounts for 50.77% of the total domestic debt, which is $40.26 billion (N14.53 trillion), whereas the State Governments and Federal Capital Territory account for 14.34% of the total domestic debt which is $11.37 billion (N4.11 trillion).

GTBank 728 x 90

Nigeria has been under a lot of fiscal crisis following the crash of oil prices triggered by the coronavirus pandemic. The oil sector accounts for about 90% of the country’s foreign exchange earnings and about 60% of its total revenue.

The country, which had lined up a series of debt issue this year, had to halt the external commercial borrowing due to oil price collapse. The Minister for Finance, Zainab Ahmed, had last week disclosed that the country would no longer go ahead with its Eurobond debt issue.

The Nigerian government, for now, is focusing on the domestic markets and concessionary loans to help fund the 2020 budget deficit which is made worse by drop in revenue. In the recently approved 2020 revised budget, the federal government is expected to borrow N850 billion from the domestic market.

onebank728 x 90

This rising debt has put a lot of pressure on the government’s resources as it spent $1.69 billion (N609,13 billion) to service its domestic debt in the first quarter of 2020 alone.

Nairametrics had reported that Nigeria’s global rating is at risk due to the sharp rise in the country’s sovereign debt and a growing finance gap. According to a report from the global rating agency, Fitch Ratings, this could trigger a rating downgrade as policymakers struggle to stimulate growth and deal with the impact of low oil prices and sharp drop in revenue.

According to Fitch, the country’s debt to revenue ration is set to deteriorate further to 538% by the end of 2020, from the 348% that it was a year earlier.

app
GTBank 728 x 90

Patricia
Continue Reading

Financial Services

CBN imposes fresh CRR debits on banks to the tune of N118 billion

These debits have inevitably tightened liquidity in the banking system and bankers are complaining.

Published

on

CRR Debits

On July 3rd, 2020, the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) once again debited many banks in Nigeria in line with its Cash Reserve Ratio (CRR) compliance requirement. This time around, about 14 banks were debited to the tune of N118 billion.

These banks are:

  • Access Bank Plc: N3 billion
  • Guaranty Trust Bank Plc: N15 billion
  • First Bank of Nigeria Ltd: N12.4 billion
  • Ecobank Nigeria: N7 billion
  • Sterling Bank Plc: N5 billion
  • Fidelity Bank Plc: N11 billion
  • Union Bank of Nigeria Plc: N12.5 billion
  • First City Monument Bank Ltd: N10 billion
  • CitiBank Nigeria Ltd: N10.2 billion
  • Stanbic IBTC Bank: N15 billion
  • Zenith Bank Plc: N7 billion
  • Wema Bank Plc: N3 billion
  • Titan Trust Bank: N2.5 billion
  • Rand Merchant Bank Nigeria Ltd: N4 billion

More details on these debits

These constant CRR debits, which typically herald the apex bank’s FX auctions as Nairametrics was made to understand, have served to significantly reduce liquidity in the system. An insider who informed Nairametrics about the latest debit said “the liquidity within the system is now very tight”. As a matter of fact, liquidity is now reportedly below N100 billion.

UBA ADS

Apparently, the CBN is using these weekly CRR debits to mop up liquidity in the system. In other words, these debits help to prevent banks from coming to the FX auctions with lots of cash. Too much FX demands tend to put the apex bank under pressure.

Note that inasmuch as the CBN is trying hard to stabilise the FX markets, these constant debits have inevitably affected banks negatively by leaving them cash-strapped. Our source, who was quoted above, earlier complained about these ‘indiscriminate debits’ when he said:

“These are huge amounts that are leaving the banking sector. It’s a squeeze on the banks. A bank like First Bank, for instance, has about N1.4 trillion in CRR with the Central Bank. And there is Zenith Bank with equally as much as N1.5 trillion. These are monies that banks can potentially put in loans at 52% at 30%, or even put in money market instruments at maybe 10%. So, for a shareholder of these banks, this CRR debits are impairing the banks’ ability to increase their earnings because now are not able to use the funds that are legitimately theirs to create money for their shareholders. And the question is that under what framework is the Central Bank choosing to take people’s money?”

GTBank 728 x 90

Banks’ stakeholders have also collectively complained

Meanwhile, bank stakeholders have also collectively complained about these incessant CRR debits by the Central Bank of Nigeria. As Nairametrics reported yesterday, the negative impacts of CBN’s constant CRR debits were among some of the issues raised by banks’ stakeholders during Standard Chartered Bank’s 2020 Africa Investor’s Conference.

It is important to point out that many banks in the country, including the likes of First Bank, now have billions of their customers’ debits sterilised for the sake of CRR compliance.

Understanding CRR

The cash reserve requirement is the minimum amount banks are expected to leave retained with the Central Bank of Nigeria from customer deposits. In January, the CRR was increased by 5% to 27.5%  by the CBN Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) who explained that the decision was intended to address monetary-induced inflation whilst retaining the benefits from the CBN’s LDR policy.

onebank728 x 90

Patricia
Continue Reading