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Phillips Consulting reviews the socio-economic impact of cancer in Nigeria

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Phillips Consulting reviews the socio-economic impact of cancer in Nigeria

In 2018 Phillips Consulting (PCl), examined the socio-economic impact of cancer in an extensive study. Responses were gathered from thousands of Nigerian Cancer victims or caregivers, family and friends.

In Nigeria, the general media are most often overwhelmed with reports of cancer victims alongside impassioned solicitations for funds for treatment abroad. Today In major cities of Nigeria, it is not no longer a strange sight to see caregivers soliciting alms from the general public for people living with this deadly disease.

Several health management organisations in Nigeria do not cover Cancer treatments; neither does The Nigerian National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS).

The cost of cancer treatments in Nigeria ranges from N850,000 ($2,361) and $10,000 (N3,600,000). Due to the masses not able to afford these costs, the number of people resorting to public intervention has constantly increased over the years; this is intuitive evidence of the great socioeconomic burden faced by cancer patients and their caregivers.

The PCL research showed that every year, Tens and Thousands of Nigerians troop abroad in search of the best and most affordable medical treatments and health care services. Destinations such as The Middle East, India, Turkey, United States of America and Europe thrive on Nigerian medical tourists.

Cancer patients spend astronomical amounts of money seeking treatment abroad, up to $60,000, excluding other associated financial costs such visa fees, flight tickets, logistics, hotel accommodation and upkeep for the patient and their caregiver. The high amount of capital flight suggests opportunities for investment along the value chain of cancer management in Nigeria.

The PCL survey showed that Nigerian women and low-income earners were the most affected by cancer, but Irrespective of one’s socio-economic status, the emotional and financial burden of fighting cancer is excruciating.

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According to the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015, total deaths caused by Cancer rose by 17% between 2005 and 2015. By 2030, cancer incidence worldwide is projected to rise by 68% to 23.6 million new cases every year. Cancer was estimated to have caused 8.8 million deaths (one in every six deaths) globally in 2015 and cost the world, in 2010, the best part of US $1.16trillion. Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the world and the most prevalent cause of NCD (non-communicable disease) death after cardiovascular disease.

In 2012, Cancers caused 3% of over two million deaths recorded in Nigeria. Guided by insights from the combined health industry, government, NGOs, researchers of all stripes and other interested corporate bodies must provide the basis for effective actions against Cancer.

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Ultimately, the task of beating cancer requires the combined efforts of all stakeholders.

“We will not only direct our significant research capabilities towards plotting the way forward; we are also prepared to support stakeholders in ensuring the effectiveness of cancer management through the effective project management of palliative programs and initiatives. Our extensive knowledge of the local environment also ensures that we are equipped to help local and international organisations deliver sustainable outcomes in their efforts towards combating cancer. Though an enormous challenge, our commitment to that task at Phillips Consulting is unflinching” Consultant at Phillips Consulting, Victor Mba

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"NM Partners" represent articles published in partnerships with Corporate Organisations, Government and Non-Governmental Institutions, and other stakeholders seeking to publish content on Nairametrics. Content includes Press Releases, Targeted content, and other forms of corporate communications targeted at our readers. Some of these content are paid for.

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Companies

Unilever earmarks N62 million as remuneration to its Non-Executive Directors in 2021

Unilever Nigeria has fixed its remuneration to the Non-executive Directors of the company in 2021 at N62 million.

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Unilever Overseas increases stake in Unilever Nigeria Plc

One of Nigeria’s leading FMCG companies, Unilever Nigeria Plc, is set to pay out a total of N62 million as remuneration to its Non-Executive Directors for the year ended December 31, 2021.

This disclosure was made by the leading consumer goods company as one of the key resolutions that would be considered and passed at the Company’s ninety-sixth (96th) Annual General Meeting, which will hold on Thursday 6 May 2021 at 10.00 am.

The famed manufacturer of Sunlight detergent also revealed that in addition to the N62 million remuneration, sitting allowances will be paid at standard agreed rates for each meeting attended and the Chairman of the company will be entitled to a vehicle allowance of N12 million gross per annum.

READ: Heavy sell-off in PZ & Unilever shares leads to N6.09 billion market value loss

Short-term benefits paid by Unilever in 2020 to its Directors

Despite the fact that Unilever Nigeria Plc has not paid its shareholders dividends for about two years now, the FMCG company paid out short-term benefits of about N511 million and N73 million to its Executive and Non-Executive Directors in 2020 respectively, compared to a sum of N590 million and N59 million it paid out in 2019 respectively. The members of the leadership team, excluding the Executive Directors of the company, were paid a total of N867 million short term benefits in 2020, down from the N1.04 billion they received in 2019.

On the flip side, the total payout as wages and salaries to the company’s employee in 2020 was N5.05 billion, this is down from the N5.99 billion which the company paid out in 2019.

READ: Abdulsamad Rabiu set to earn N39.4 billion from his cement business

In case you missed it

According to a recent result by Unilever Nigeria Plc, the company made a loss of about N492 million in the first quarter of 2021. This figure is 144.1% lower when compared to the profit of N1.114 billion made by the company in the corresponding quarter of 2020.

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Unilever’s revenue however surged by 45.7% during the quarter. However, the growth in the cost of sales, and the huge 63.3% increase in marketing and administrative expenses pressured the profits down to a loss of N492 million in the first quarter of 2021.

READ: Guinness shares surge by 9.89%, lifting the brewer’s capitalization by N5.9 billion

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What you should know

  • Shares of Unilever Nigeria Plc are currently valued at N12.95 per share, placing the YTD loss in the shares of the company at -6.83%.
  • Unilever Nigeria Plc is the sixth most valuable consumer goods company listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange, with a robust market valuation put at N74.4 billion, higher than Guinness Nigeria Plc, NASCON Allied Industries Plc and PZ Cussons.
  • The shares of the top FMCG brand is trading 23.8% lower than its 52-week high price of N17, and 23.3% higher than its 52 week low of N10.5.

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Companies

COVID-19, VAT, FX scarcity adversely impacted our operations in 2020 – Nigerian Breweries boss says

NB Plc’s operations in 2020 were adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, VAT increase and FX devaluation.

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Heineken scoops more Nigerian Breweries shares in insider disclosure

The management of Nigeria’s leading brewer, Nigerian Breweries Plc has revealed that its operations in 2020 were adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, VAT increase, FX devaluation and scarcity of foreign exchange.

This statement was made by the Managing Director of Nigerian Breweries, Mr Jordi Borrut Bel, at the company’s pre-AGM media briefing for the financial year-end 2020, which held in Lagos this week.

He noted that the increase in the brewer’s cost in 2020 was due to the COVID-19 pandemic which disrupted the company’s operations, as well as the increase in VAT, devaluation and FX scarcity which has put pressure on input cost.

READ: Alcoholic beverage makers on NSE lose a total N27.7 billion in a single day

The Nigerian Breweries boss explained further that the increase in cost could not be fully attributed to currency devaluation and foreign exchange scarcity.

He explained that the increase in costs of goods sold, as reported in its audited financial results, could also be linked to the increase in the volume of goods sold, as the company’s sales volume in 2020 increased by almost the same percentage as the cost of goods sold.

To deal with this challenge going forward, he revealed that the company is focused on the supply chain, and will continue to seek out ways to mitigate any of the price increases coming from FX scarcity.

READ: Brewery sector: A quarter to forget

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The company’s profitability in question?

An analysis of the company’s result revealed that despite the 4.3% increase in net revenue from N323.00 billion recorded in 2019, to a total of N337.01 billion in 2020, the company’s profit declined significantly by 53.3% to N7.53 billion.

Speaking on this, Jordi Borrut in his statement at the press briefing noted that the brewer’s business performance in 2020 was quite impressive especially in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and economic recession. Despite these challenges, the company maintained a strong and healthy balance sheet.

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There was a slight reduction in profitability but compared to the previous year, the business witnessed an improved growth in revenue. The significance of this is that the business became more stable and healthier,” he said.

READ: Nigeria’s triangular beer war on the rise with the arrival of Budweiser

What you should know

  • Nigerian breweries, being the largest brewer in the country, maintained its stance in terms of generating profits year-on-year. The company emerged as the only brewer to record a profit of N7.37 billion from its operations in 2020, 54.3% lower than 2019 figures (N16.1 billion).
  • From this, the leading brewer was able to pay shareholders a total dividend of N7.5 billion, translating to a dividend of 94 kobos per share – a dividend payout in which exceeds 100%.
  • While Guinness and International Breweries made a loss of N12.6 billion and N24.9 billion respectively, this reality impacted their ability to pay their shareholders dividends in 2020.

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