Uber just rolled out these new guidelines to curb irritating drivers


Ride sharing app, Uber in the midst of the controversy surrounding the company has revealed its updated guidelines for both users and drivers.

Here are some reasons why you could lose access to Uber as a rider and what each could mean:

Damaging drivers’ or other passengers’ property:  For example, damaging the car, breaking or vandalising a phone, intentionally spilling food or drink, smoking, or vomiting due to excessive alcohol consumption.

Drivers can be very careless especially when they drive other people’s car. We believe this means, if a driver is reported to have damaged an Uber Partner’s car, he or she may never get to work via Uber again, even if it is the driver’s personal car.

Physical contact with the driver or fellow riders: As our Community Guidelines make clear, you shouldn’t touch or flirt with other people in the car. As a reminder, Uber has a no sex rule. That’s no sexual conduct with drivers or fellow riders, no matter what. And you should never hit or otherwise hurt a driver or fellow passenger.

We’ve often heard stories of flirtatious drivers. If you are an Uber driver, we suggest you keep a good distance from your customers. In fact, politely request that they sit at the back to avoid any form of contact even if it is eyes.

Use of inappropriate and abusive language or gestures:  For example, asking overly personal questions, using verbal threats, and making comments or gestures that are aggressive, sexual, discriminatory, or disrespectful.

Some Uber drivers are annoyingly chatty. If you are one who thinks chatting up passengers is being polite, you are dead wrong. Most passengers just need a ride to their destination safe and sound. Your conversation should be professional and restricted to things like “do I drive a little faster or slower or steady”, “Do you want music” “Do you need the AC increased”. And you ask these questions at the start of the trip and not intermittently.

Unwanted contact with the driver or fellow passenger after the trip is over:  For example, texting, calling, or visiting someone in person after a ride has been completed. Remember, in Australia and New Zealand you can call and text your driver directly from the Uber app without ever having to share your personal phone number. This means that your phone number stays anonymous and is never given to the driver.

Remember your passenger just needs a ride and not a friend. Never ask for a passengers number except they ask you. And when they do, never initiate a call for a ride.

Breaking the local law while using Uber:  For example, bringing open containers of alcohol or drugs into the car; travelling in large groups that exceed the number of seat belts in the car; asking drivers to break local traffic laws such as speed limits; or using Uber to commit a crime, including drug and human trafficking or the sexual exploitation of children.

That you are an Uber driver does not make you above the law. Avoid the temptation of breaking traffic laws.

 

The ride sharing company may have been forced to revise its guidelines following complaints from several passengers about harassment from drivers and poor service. Uber has also faced backlash from drivers who felt they were not adequately protected or remunerated following the company’s decision to give riders a 40% discount. As a result, some drivers have switched to competitors like Taxify.

Founder and CEO of Uber David Kalanick recently had to step down from the company’s board at the behest of majority shareholders. The company has been enmeshed in various crisis ranging from a culture of discrimination against female staff, to allegedly stealing software from Whymo a rival startup by Google.

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