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Africa’s largest telecoms firm, MTN, to divest from its Middle East operations

The MTN Group is in advanced talks to sell its stake in MTN Syria to the minority shareholder.

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Africa’s largest telecoms firm, the MTN Group, has announced its plans to exit the Middle East. This is part of the wireless carrier’s strategic plan to shift focus entirely to its home continent, Africa.

The mobile operator said that as part of its medium-term strategy, it will be leaving the Middle East, starting with the sales of its 75% stake in MTN Syria. Overly reduced revenue from war-torn Syria and the complex nature of the operating environment in the country are part of the reasons MTN is divesting.

READ MORE: MTN seeking to sell stake in Jumia Technologies AG

MTN’s Chief Executive Officer, Rob Shuter, noted during a conference call with reporters, that “the Middle East environment is becoming increasingly complex and it contributes less to the group’s earnings.’’

Shuter disclosed that the disposals in the Middle East region will be done in a phased manner, with its 3 consolidated subsidiaries in Yemen, Afghanistan, and Syria earmarked to be sold first. These markets only contribute about 4% to the group’s earnings before interest, depreciation, taxation, and amortization.

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READ ALSO: Why MTN is being dragged to court by families of American soldiers 

The MTN Group is in advanced talks to sell its stake in MTN Syria to the minority shareholder, TeleInvest, who has 25% stake in the firm, according to the CEO. He believes that the telecoms firm is better served to focus on its Pan-African strategy and simplify its portfolio by leaving the Middle East region in an orderly manner.

In the medium term, the group will also dispose of its 49% stake in MTN Irancell, one of its largest markets.

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The South African firm plans to exit the entire portfolio in time, which will then leave it with 17 subsidiaries in Africa.

Just yesterday, Nairametrics reported about MTN’s plan to sell its stake in Jumia Technologies. MTN will also be divesting from telecommunications infrastructure firm, IHS Towers. The divestments from Jumia and IHS Towers were informed by the decision to raise funds in order to reduce MTN’s debts. It will also help the company to refocus its operations.

Chike Olisah is a graduate of accountancy with over 15 years working experience in the financial service sector. He has worked in research and marketing departments of three top commercial banks. Chike is a senior member of the Nairametrics Editorial Team. You may contact him via his email- [email protected]

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Companies

ValuAlliance distributes value fund of N10 per unit for H1, 2020

ValuAlliance Value Fund has declared the distribution to unit holders, the sum of N10.00/unit for the financial year ended June 30, 2020. 

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ValuAlliance distributes value fund of N10 per unit for H1, 2020

ValuAlliance Value Fund (“Value Fund” or the “Fund”), formerly called the SIM Capital Alliance Value Fund, has declared the distribution to unit holders, the sum of N10.00/unit for the financial year ended June 30, 2020.

This is according to a notification by the firm, sent to the Nigerian Stock Exchange market and seen by Nairametrics.

The latest distribution indicates a decline of N1/unit when compared to its distribution in the corresponding period last year.

READ MORE: SEC reinstates DEAP Capital’s Board

The key highlights of the recent notification include:

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  • Annual General Meeting Date: 21st December 2020
  • AGM Venue: 33A Alfred Rewane (Kingsway) Road, Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria
  • Proposed Distribution: ₦10/unit
  • Qualification Date: 9th December 2020
  • Closure of Register Date: 10th December 2020
  • Payment Date: 23rd December 2020

READ: Exxon Mobil to cut 14,000 jobs as pandemic hit oil demand, prices

What you should know

  • The Value Fund is a closed-end Fund registered and regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), whose units are listed on the main board of the NSE.
  • The Value Fund for the year ended June 30, 2020 achieved a growth of 2.83% Year-on-Year, with a cumulative return of 125.32% since inception, which translates to a 9-year Internal Rate of Return (IRR) of 12.06%.

Explore Data on the Nairametrics Research Website

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Companies

PZ Cusson announces retirement of Chairman, Kola Jamodu

PZ has announced the retirement Chief Kola Jamodu as Non-Executive Director and Chairman of the Board of the company.

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Kola Jamodu

The Board of Directors of PZ Cussons Nigeria Plc has announced the retirement of Chief Kola Jamodu as Non-Executive Director and Chairman of the Board of the company.

This disclosure was made in a notification signed by the Company’s Secretary, Jacqueline Ezeokwelume, and sent to the floor of the Nigerian Stock Exchange.

According to the notification issued by Mrs. Ezeokwelume, Chief Kola Jamodu will retire as a Non-Executive Director and Chairman of the Board effective 11 December 2020 to enable him to pursue other personal endeavours.

What you should know

Chief Jamodu joined PZ Cussons Group in 1974 and served in Executive positions for 24 years rising to the position of Chief Executive Officer of the Company, a position he held until he retired in 1999.

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He thereafter continued as a Non-Executive Chairman of the Board until 2001 when he was appointed as the Honourable Minister of Industry of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, a position he held until 2003.

He was reappointed as the Chairman of the Board of PZ Cussons Nigeria Plc in November 2014.

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Companies

Naira devaluation, FX scarcity caused increase in cost of goods – Nigerian Breweries

Nigerian Breweries has revealed that Naira devaluation, FX scarcity caused increase in the cost of its goods in 2020.

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Jordi Borrut Bel, Nigerian Breweries Plc

The Finance Director of Nigerian Breweries Plc, Rob Kleinjan, has revealed that the increase in the brewer’s costs of goods was due to the devaluation in naira and FX scarcity, which led to the increase in the cost of inputs such as sorghum and sugar, as they are not fully produced locally.

This disclosure was made during the Nigerian Breweries’ Fact Behind Figures results presentation today.

However, Kleinjan explained that the increase in cost could not be fully attributed to currency devaluation and foreign exchange scarcity, which exerts pressure on imported input materials.

He said the increase in Nigerian Breweries’ costs of goods sold, as reported in its unaudited financial results, could also be linked to the volume of goods sold, as the company’s sales volume in Q3 increased by almost the same percentage as the cost of goods sold.

However, Mr. Kleinijan reiterated that to mitigate further losses, it was important for the company to focus on the supply chain and seek ways to mitigate price increases.

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What they are saying

The Managing Director of Nigerian Breweries, Mr. Jordi Borrut, while speaking at the virtual event said:

In 2020, the results of Nigerian Breweries were adversely impacted by COVID, VAT increase, FX devaluation and scarcity of foreign exchange. The year started with a promising 1st quarter, which was heavily impacted in Q2. The Nigerian market, however, rebounded in Q3.”

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Mr. Rob Kleinjan, while explaining the factors behind the increase in Nigerian Breweries’ cost of goods sold in the first nine months of 2020, said:

It is also clear that the increase in cost is due to the devaluation and the FX scarcity which has put pressure on our input cost. If you look into the main elements we use, which are sorghum and sugar – they are not fully produced locally, so when the currency is devalued, the prices of these inputs will soar.

That’s why it’s important that we are focused on the supply chain, and seek for ways we can mitigate any of the price increases, because the increase in cost comes from the input prices, which come from FX scarcity.”

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