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Debt Securities

Why interest rates on treasury bills, bonds crashed

The yoyo between debt and equity is likely to ensue as uncertainty remains in the forex market.

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Why interest rates on treasury bills, bonds crashed

The Nigerian debt market has been faced with a series of challenges, most of which were triggered by the worst pandemic recorded in human history Its prospects in attracting foreign portfolio investors were dampened as macros on Nigeria’s economy revealed a downtrend in the market, and this trend has only worsened in the past months. 

The fixed income market sustained its downward trajectory for the third consecutive month in June 2020 largely driven by excess liquidity as well as an overall scarcity of instruments in the market. Reports from several analysts indicate the demand for fixed income securities has increased considerably over the last 6 months driving down interest rates earned by investors. 

Victor Silas an Investment analyst told Nairametrics about the OMO bills liquidity for the month of June. He said“For June, fixed income rates were liquidity-driven following the ban of locals from OMO and limited investment outlets. OMO bills maturities are creating more liquidity for locals and it is finding its way to the bond market and Treasury bill.   

READ MORE: How to invest in uncertain times

“The 2050 trading below 11% yield and the 364-day Treasury bill closing at 3.4%. It just tells you there are a lot of liquidity concerns for locals.” 

Most foreign portfolio investors based abroad are staying out of naira debt dominated securities; this shows that Nigeria’s debt markets are now controlled by local investors.  

Nigeria attracted just $67.9 million in Foreign Portfolio Investment (FPI) inflow for the month of April 2020, the lowest inflow recorded this year. A cursory look at the Central Bank data shows that FPI sharply reversed from $2.30 billion at the beginning of the year (January) to just $67.9 million inflow in April 2020. Nigeria like most emerging markets relies heavily on foreign portfolio investments to shore up its external reserves and manage its exchange rate position.   

Portfolio inflow into money market instruments fell from N1.6 billion and N1.4 billion in January and February respectively to just N229 billion and N49 million in April and May respectivelyOn the flip side, those that still have their investment stuck in Nigeria, have stayed away from any other type of investment except money market instruments such as bonds and treasury bills.  Most of the investors are waiting patiently for the central bank to fund their dollar purchase so they can exit. 

READ MORE: Nigeria’s pension contributors add N100billion to pension asset

Issuers Market 

Emmanuel Orji Emerging Market/ Fixed Income Trader, COMERCIO PARTNERS spoke to Nairametrics on the performance of fixed income securities in June. He said;  

“Subsequently, the unexpected reduced sale at the June bond auction of NGN100 billion as against the NGN150 billion originally offered further strengthened the aggressive bullish run in the bond market.  

“The bond auction closed relatively strong as a result, with a bid to cover ratio of 3.6x and rates declining by 120bps, 70bps, and 45bps to print at 8.00%, 11.00%, and 12.15% across the 3-year, 5-year, and 30-year maturities respectively.  Note: BPS refers to basis points, a financial term for percentages. 100 basis point is equal to 1%. 

READ ALSO: Nigeria’s foreign debt has breached a 15-year trigger

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“As a result, yields for the benchmark securities monitored declined across all maturities on a month-on-month basis, with yields of the sovereign bonds with 3-year, 5-year, 10-year and 20-year maturities declining by 332 bps, 138 bps, 96 bps, and 138 bps to close at 5.64%, 7.13%, 9.76%, and 10.05% respectively.  

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“Given the amount of idle PFA cash sitting in bank placement (c. NGN1.5 trillion) and the sudden weakness in demand for equities, we expect the buying interest to persist in the near term, which should drive yields lower in the bonds market.”  

Nigerian fiscal stakeholders have resorted to borrowing domestically as opposed to seeking for funds abroad, another effect of the pandemic. This is expected to lead to an increase in the yields of FGN bonds in the short and mid-term horizon as the inward plan to seek funds locally intensifies. 

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Where this leaves equities  

Concomitantly, the equities market benefitted from the apparent thirst for asset yielding investments in recent months. As yields for safer investment fell, investors shifted to the equities market taking advantage of the earning season often market by dividend payouts. Most stocks paid dividend yields in double digits following the stock market crash in March 2020.  

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But by June the market sell-offs ensued with investors moving funds out to secure stakes in corporate debt securities. The yoyo between debt and equity is likely to ensue as uncertainty remains in the forex market and the country’s stimulus plans.  

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Some retail investors who spoke to Nairametrics insist they have abandoned the Nigerian Stock Market preferring to trade in cryptocurrencies or US stocks. The proliferation of intech supported investing apps has made cross border investing easier providing access to market far beyond the shores of Nigeria. 

 

Olumide Adesina is a France-born Nigerian. He is a Certified Investment Trader, with more than 15 years of working expertise in Investment trading. Follow Olumide on Twitter @tokunboadesina. He is a Member of the Chartered Financial Analyst Society.

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Debt Securities

FEC approves new Debt Management strategy for 2020–2023

The FEC has approved a new Medium Term Debt Management Strategy (MTDS) for Nigeria.

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Debt Management Office resumes FGN savings bond offer on August 10, Eurobonds, Patience Oniha, DMO, External debt servicing

The Federal Government has indicated it is looking inward as far as debt is concerned.

This point was unscored in the approval of the medium term Debt Management Strategy for the period 2020-2023 as disclosed by the Debt Management Office (DMO) in a statement issued on Wednesday after the FEC held its meeting in Abuja.

The MTDS  policy as a document tries to articulate the debt mix of the government considering the cost and risk trade-offs that best suit the country’s broader macroeconomic and public debt management

READ: Investors scramble for DMO sovereign sukuk as it records 446% oversubscription

It stated, “The MTDS, 2020-2023 has been prepared by the DMO, in collaboration with Federal Ministry of Finance, Budget and National Planning and the Central Bank of Nigeria.

“Other collaborating stakeholders are the Budget Office of the Federation, National Bureau of Statistics and the Office of the Accountant-General of the Federation.”

READ: Nigeria’s high recurrent costs, low revenue and escalating debt numbers

What has changed

With the new strategy, a larger proportion of new borrowing will be from domestic sources using long-term instruments while for External Borrowing, concessional funding from multilateral and bilateral sources will be prioritised.

Also, the target of fiscal sustainability has been increased from 25% (MTDS, 2016-2019) to 40% in the new strategy.

In simple language, the government wants to increase borrowing from 25% of GDP to 40%. While this will provide investment outlets to investors and mop up cash and calm inflation rate, it will also put a lot of pressure on the domestic debt market, interest rate and liquidity.

READ: Mining Cadestre Office (MCO) generates revenue of N2.303 billion in 2020

The target, according to DMO, was increased to accommodate new borrowings to fund Budget Deficits and other obligations of Government; Promissory Notes to be issued to settle Government Arrears; and, the Ways and Means Advance at the Central Bank of Nigeria.

DMO added that the strategy would sustain the issuance of longer-tenored instruments with tenors of 10 years and above, in order to effectively manage Refinancing Risks.

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Why it matters

The new debt policy has to be reworked in light of the current global pandemic, reduced revenue from shock and volatility in the oil market. The public works in the budget will be funded, indicating there is a low likelihood of project abandonment.

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Government appetite for debt seems to have found some cover or justification from the assertion by DMO that Nigeria is still well below the threshold 55% for countries in Nigeria’s peer group, but massing debt could constraint government flexibility in public finance in the coming years and reduce monetary policy tool available to CBN.

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Debt Securities

Ecobank Nigeria to launch $300 million senior notes on International Debt Market

Ecobank Nigeria has announced that it is seeking to raise $300 million from the international debt capital market through the issuance of senior notes.

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Ecobank Nigeria

Ecobank Nigeria, a subsidiary of Ecobank Transnational Incorporated (‘’ETI’’) has announced that it is seeking to raise $300 million from the international debt capital market through the issuance of senior notes.

This is contained in a disclosure signed by the Group Head, Adenike Laoye and published on the website of the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE).

READ: Nigeria makes sudden U-turn, suspends external borrowing from international debt market 

According to the bank, the proceeds from the Eurobond will help to provide medium-term funding for the company and also help to enhance its capacity to support international trade and service in Africa.

A part of the disclosure reads, “Ecobank Nigeria Limited (the “Bank”), a key subsidiary of Ecobank Transnational Incorporated (“ETI”) is seeking to raise capital from the international debt capital market through the issuance of US$300 million senior notes (the “Notes”), pursuant to the United States Securities and Exchange Commission Rule 144A and Regulation S (the “Transaction”).”

READ: FUGAZ; Nigerian banks considered too big to fail

What you should know

  • The Notes will be listed on the London Stock Exchange through a Dutch special purposes funding vehicle.
  • The bank also noted that the transaction is subject to prevailing market conditions and the conclusion of the necessary transaction documentation.
  • It is important to note that Ecobank Nigeria intends to list the Notes on the London Stock Exchange, with the expectation that the Notes will be traded on its regulated market.
  • Also, the Central Bank of Nigeria has confirmed that it has no objection to the Transaction, as stated in the disclosure.
  • Recall that Nairametrics reported in January that Ecobank Nigeria announced that it secured a N50 billion, 10-year bilateral subordinated loan with the aim of maintaining stable liquidity and improving its balance sheet.

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