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Will the United States hamper the rise in oil prices?

The United States is facing a national crisis with the most significant number of coronavirus cases globally, the worst unemployment levels seen in decades, and massive crowd protests from state to state by their citizens.

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Last week Friday, Oil finished higher after oil traders weighed on the de-escalation in the strain between the U.S. and China, and a significant drop in U.S. oil rigs (which is an indicator for declines in U.S oil production). However, some events occurred during the week, which should be a cause for concern for the bullish momentum.

The United States is facing a national crisis with the most significant number of coronavirus cases globally, the worst unemployment levels seen in decades, and massive crowd protests from state to state by their citizens. The downside to this downside is the possibility of a second wave of infections as social distancing seems to be thrown out of the window for mass protests. Furthermore, if protests and riots continue, business activity will likely collapse and would most likely hurt demand as the United States is the largest oil consumer in the world.

On the supply front, prices also declined mid-week as the American Petroleum Institute (API) reported a large crude oil inventory draw of 8.731 million barrels for the week ending May 22. These figures deviated from the prediction of 2.50 million barrels by analysts. In the past weeks, buoyed by the rise in oil prices, some Energy producers in the U.S hinted on resuming production, which only adds more supply to the market.  It would be counterproductive for Shale companies to boost output now as most companies “need prices at least in the low $40s per barrel to cover direct costs”, according to Ian Nieboer, who happens to be a managing director at consultant Enverus. Prices in this range we are at does not help the cause. The CEO of Parsley, CEO Matt Gallagher, confirmed in an interview weeks ago that “Currently the world does not need more of our product and defends the need for his company to put a hold on drilling”.

READ ALSO: Retail investors bet in Bitcoin rises, Hedge fund billionaire joins in crypto-investing

Last week Friday, Oil prices edged lower at the morning session after the EIA data showed weak fuel demand in the world’s largest oil-consuming country. Christopher Louney, an RBC Capital Markets analyst, said in a statement that “the previous weekend which happened to be Memorial Day weekend did not bring motorists out in large numbers like many market bulls were hoping.” Fuel demand remained limp, albeit various states lifting travel restrictions and lockdowns.

Another plausible way the United States can hurt prices is by hurting China. There were some sharp declines in prices noticed last week after palpable tensions between the two superpowers. Although the Oil bulls were boosted on Friday as Trump’s press conference did not indicate the U.S reneging on the trade deal with China. However, this does not signify a conclusion on the tensions between the two nations, and a possible escalation is still on the cards if China reacts to the impending sanctions meted by the United States.  Early Monday morning, some reports suggest China has put a halt on some U.S. farm imports, which impacted U.S. stocks and European stocks. The report by Bloomberg News reported that China told state-run companies to pause purchases of U.S. products, including soybeans, as pork product orders were also canceled. This impasse reminds me of how oil became volatile last year before we got a “phase 1 deal” between both nations. Now is not the time for economic wars, the virus is already enough on our hands.

READ MORE: Oil price gains likely to halt over demand uncertainty, as US-China tension intensifies

Sigma Pensions

Conclusively, the United States wants higher prices, but their internal energy industry and policies might weigh on oil futures prices. Oil recovery has a long way to go. Just a reminder that the lack of storage facilities last month caused us to witness negative prices for the first time in history, and the U.S infatuation with shale oil and drilling new wells is why we might never see our beloved $100 oil again.

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Dapo-Thomas Opeoluwa is an Investment Banker and Energy analyst. He holds a degree in MSc. International Business, Banking and Finance from the University of Dundee and also holds a B.Sc in Economics from Redeemers University. As an Oil Analyst at Nairametrics, he focuses mostly on the energy sector, fundamentals for oil prices and analysis behind every market move. Opeoluwa is also experienced in the areas of politics, business consultancy, and investments. You may contact him via his email- [email protected]

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Around the World

Trump to return to social media with his own platform in 2 months

Over 2 months after he was banned from Twitter, Facebook, others, Donald Trump is working on making a return.

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U.S. budget suffers a deficit of $3.1 trillion in 2020, as pandemic slams the economy, President Trump to decide fate of TikTok in 24-36 hours, Vaccine, America's Trump finally bans TikTok, WeChat, US imposes visa ban on Nigerians for election-related activities, I am not going to do second debate - Trump

Former US President, Donald Trump, will be back on social media in the near future, over 2 months after he was banned from Twitter, Facebook, and others.

This follows plans by the former President to launch his own social media platform within the next 2 or 3 months.

This disclosure was made by Trump’s Senior Adviser, Jason Miller, on Sunday, March 22, 2021, during a chat with Fox News’ #MediaBuzz.

READ: President Biden revokes Trump’s ban for green card applicants in US

What Donald Trump’s Senior Adviser is saying

Jason Miller, who was a spokesman for Trump’s 2020 campaign, told the media network that the former President would soon get back to social media space with a new platform of his own that would completely redefine the game.

Miller, while talking to Fox News, said, “I do think that we’re going to see President Trump returning to social media in probably about two or three months here, with his own platform. And this is something that I think will be the hottest ticket in social media; it’s going to completely redefine the game, and everybody is going to be waiting and watching to see what exactly President Trump does.”

Although he did not provide more in terms of details, Miller revealed that Trump had been having high-powered meetings at his Florida resort, Mar-a-Lago, with various teams regarding the venture, and that numerous companies had approached Trump.

Miller said the new platform was going to be big, while also predicting that Trump would draw tens of millions of people.

Sigma Pensions

In case you missed it

  • It can be recalled that former President Trump was banned from Twitter after the January 6, attack on the Capitol by his supporters. He was accused of inciting his supporters after he rejected the US Presidential election result which he claimed was a fraud.
  • Twitter last week said it would seek public input on when and how it should ban world leaders, saying it was reviewing its policy and considering whether leaders should be held to the same rules as other users.

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Around the World

Tesla investor sues Elon Musk for causing problems with his tweets

An investor in the US electric car maker, Tesla, has sued the company’s founder, Elon Musk over alleged erratic tweets.

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Tesla Investor Sues Elon Musk for Causing Problems with His Tweets

Elon Musk, the controversial multi-billionaire is being sued by an investor in his company. Musk is being accused by the investor of unsettling the markets and exposing his investors to high risk with his “erratic tweets”.

Chase Garrity an investor in the US electric car maker, Tesla, has sued the founder of the company for his erratic Twitter messaging which according to him, has exposed the company to high legal risks and billions in price losses.

The 105-page lawsuit was published in the US court of Delaware and it accuses Musk of violating the settlement negotiated with the US Securities and Exchange Commission in 2018.

READ: Battle of Titans: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos share world’s richest title

The lawsuit also includes the entire Tesla board and its supervisory body for not calling Musk to order.

In May 2020 Musk caused a 14 billion dollar loss in market value on a single trading day with a series of unguarded tweets. He tweeted about Tesla’s market value being too high and how he was going to dispose of all physical assets.

The lawsuit stated that any further unbridled tweet from Musk would have dire consequences for Tesla’s future funding opportunities.

READ: Elon Musk gains $25 billion in a day, as Tesla surges by 20%

Sigma Pensions

What you should know 

  • Remember Nairametrics posted a story on how Musk tweets once again caused a serious ripple effect in the crypto world. His tweet helped Bitcoin gain $6000. He later invested heavily in Bitcoin.
  • Manager Magazine stated that analysts are not comfortable with such a move and view it as some kind of manipulation.
  • Musk in April last year posted a joke photo of Tesla going bankrupt. This once again unsettled investors.
  • Tesla Management has not released a statement on this fresh lawsuit.

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